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Obituary



Fred Leventhal
June 22, 1921 - June 16, 2016

 

Obituary provided by Nexstep Manufacturing and the Leventhal family.



 

Fred Leventhal died one week before his 95th birthday on June 16, 2016. Born in Cleveland, OH, on June 22, 1921, Leventhal was the youngest of seven siblings.

Leventhal was considered by some as the last member of a golden generation of Springfield, OH, business leaders who were also philanthropists deeply committed to the community.

At the age of 17, Fred Leventhal and his brother, Harry, arrived in Springfield to purchase Vining Broom from the widow, Mrs. Vining. Over the course of their 50-year partnership, Vining Broom grew from a one-employee operation to one of Springfield’s largest employers (providing jobs for over 650 people in four states), and the largest corn broom manufacturing company in the United States.

In 1993, Leventhal convinced a group of investors to buy both Vining Broom and O-Cedar, combining them into the largest cleaning equipment company in the country. He served on the board of O-Cedar/Vining Household Products Co. until it disbanded in 2003. Leventhal also served as president of FL Enterprises, a cleaning tool redistributor located in the same office as Nexstep Commercial Products (now run by his son, Todd Leventhal), until the week prior to his death.

Among his many career accomplishments, Fred Leventhal served as president of the National Broom Manufacturers Association, was the first recipient of the Jack Gantz Award for outstanding service to the industry and the community from the American Brush Manufacturers Association, was inducted into the Springfield Business Hall of Fame, and received the Master Entrepreneur of the Year Award for Dayton/Miami Valley (OH) area, the Chamber of Commerce Award of Excellence, and the first Richard L. Kuss Lifetime Achievement Award from the Chamber of Commerce of Greater Springfield.

 

Fred Leventhal committed himself equally to the development of his business and to engendering social change. As a young Jewish man, he worked every day to make Springfield a place where all people, regardless of faith, race, or creed, were welcome and could prosper. The Leventhal name has come to represent a legacy of perseverance, kind-heartedness, and a commitment to the
common good.

 

His devotion to his community was highlighted by years of service on countless local boards, such as Clark State, Wittenberg University, and Springfield Foundation. Leventhal also received numerous awards for his efforts to build and strengthen the Springfield community from a myriad of organizations including the Springfield Rotary, Kiwanis, Jaycees, and Junior Achievement.

 


Fred Leventhal

Fred Leventhal


Wittenberg University was especially meaningful for Leventhal as he served on its Board of Directors and established the Fred R. Leventhal Family Lecture series—a free lecture series open to the public that, for 34 years, brought speakers such as Nobel Peace Prize recipient Elie Wiesel, entrepreneur and publisher of Forbes magazine Malcolm Forbes, and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin to Springfield.

Celebrating his contribution to humanity, his community, and the world, Fred Leventhal received an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Wittenberg in 2006, and its highest non-academic award, the Medal of Honor, in 2011.

A deeply religious man, Leventhal was a lifetime member of Temple Sholom, and served as its board president. Furthermore, he was known nationally, serving as a board member of the Hebrew Union College and the National Conference of Christians & Jews; and receiving the Shofar Award for dedication on behalf of Judaism and the Boy Scouts of America.

His other accolades include the Service to Mankind Award from Noon Sertoma Club, the United Way Hall of Fame Award, and a proclamation from the Mayor of the City of Springfield declaring March 26, 1994 as Fred Leventhal Day. His absence will surely be felt in the Springfield, OH, community and throughout the cleaning industry.

He is survived by his wife of 69 years, Maxine; their two children, Fern (husband, Augustine) and Todd (wife, Gabriele), five grandchildren, three stepgrandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

 



Imports Mixed While Exports Show Increases

import

Including complete list of March 2016

Import/Export statistics

 

By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine Associate Editor

 

U.S. government trade figures for the first three months of 2016 indicate raw material imports were up in two categories outlined: brush backs and metal handles, compared to the first three months of 2015. For March 2016, two categories outlined reported increases: brush backs and metal handles, compared to March 2015.

Import totals for the first three months of 2016 were up in six finished goods categories outlined: brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents, toothbrushes, hairbrushes, paint rollers, paintbrushes and upright brooms, compared to the first three months of 2015. In March 2016, six categories outlined recorded decreases: Brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents, toothbrushes, hairbrushes, shaving brushes, paint rollers and paintbrushes, compared to March 2015.

 

 

– RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS –


Hog Bristle

The United States imported 13,531 kilograms of hog bristle in March 2016, down 25 percent from 18,143 kilograms imported in March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 58,479 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, down 4 percent from 60,673 kilograms imported during the first three months of 2015.

China sent 58,301 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first three months of 2016.
The average price per kilogram for March 2016 was $25.36, up 21 percent from the average price per kilogram for March 2015 of $20.96.

The average price per kilogram for the first three months of 2016 was $24.80, up 43 percent from the average price per kilogram of $17.34 for the first three months of 2015.

 

Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles during March 2016 was 1.4 million, down 26 percent from 1.9 million for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 3.5 million broom and mop handles were imported, down 17 percent from 4.2 million for the first three months of 2015.

During the first three months of 2016, the United States received 1.7 million broom and mop handles from Brazil and 1.1 million from Honduras.

The average price per handle for March 2016 was 81 cents, down 13 percent from the average for March 2015 of 93 cents. The average price for the first three months of 2016 was 92 cents, up 2 percent from 90 cents for the first three

months of 2015.

 

Brush Backs

March 2016 imports of brush backs totaled 637,597, up 28 percent from 527,984 for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 1.9 million brush backs were imported, up 46 percent from 1.3 million for the first three months of 2015.

Canada sent 1 million brush backs to the United States during the first three months of 2016.


The average price per brush back was 44 cents during March 2016, down 6 percent from 47 cents for March 2015. For the first three months of 2016, the average price per brush back was also 44 cents, down 10 percent from 49 cents for the first three months of 2015.

 

Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles during March 2016 was 2.5 million, up 32 percent from 1.9 million for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 7.1 million metal handles were imported, up 9 percent from 6.5 million for the first three months of 2015.

During the first three months of 2016, China exported 3.5 million metal handles to the United States, while Spain sent 2.6 million.

The average price per handle for March 2016 was 94 cents, down 20 percent from $1.18 for March 2015. The average price for the first three months

of 2016 was 93 cents, down 8 percent from the average price for the first three months of

2015 of $1.01.



– FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS –

Brooms Of Broom Corn
Valued At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 550,542 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during March 2016, down 2 percent from 564,591 for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 1.8 million brooms of broom corn were imported, up 6 percent from 1.7 million for the first three months of 2015.

Nearly all of the brooms exported to the United States during the first three months of 2016 came from Mexico.

The average price per broom for March 2016 was $2.54, up 1 percent from $2.52 for March 2015. The average price per broom for the first three months of 2016 was also $2.54, up 1 percent from the average price for the first three months of 2015 of $2.51.

 

Brooms & Brushes of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during March 2016 was 361,467, up 2 percent from 353,055 brooms and brushes imported during March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 1 million brooms and brushes

were imported, the same as for the first three months of 2015.

Sri Lanka exported 473,779 brooms and brushes to the United States during the first three months of 2016, while Canada sent 343,663.

The average price per unit for March 2016 was 93 cents, down 28 percent from the average price for March 2015 of $1.30. The average price for the first three months of 2016 was $1.09, down 4 percent from $1.14 for the first three months of 2015.

 

Toothbrushes

The United States imported 71.1 million toothbrushes in March 2016, down 21 percent from 89.5 million imported in March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 268 million toothbrushes were imported, up 13 percent from 237.5 million imported during the first three months of 2015.

China sent 192.2 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first three months of 2016.


The average price per toothbrush for March 2016 was 22 cents, down 8 percent from 24 cents for March 2015. The average price for the first three months of 2016 was 21 cents, down 16 percent from the average price for the first three months of 2015 of 25 cents.

 

Hairbrushes

March 2016 imports of hairbrushes totaled 2.6 million, down 21 percent from 3.3 million for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 10.7 million hairbrushes were imported, up 7 percent from 10 million for the first three months of 2015.

China shipped 10.2 million hairbrushes to the United States during the first three months of 2016.

The average price per hairbrush was 26 cents during March 2016, down 7 percent from 28 cents for March 2015. For the first three months of 2016, the average price per hairbrush was 25 cents, down 11 percent from the average price for the first three months of 2015 of 28 cents.

Shaving Brushes
The United States imported 5.2 million shaving brushes in March 2016, down 51 percent from 10.6 million imported in March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 20.2 million shaving brushes were imported, down 28 percent from 28.2 million imported during the first three months of 2015.

China sent 13.6 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first three months of 2016.

The average price per shaving brush for March 2016 was 12 cents, up 33 percent from the average price for March 2015 of 9 cents. The average price for the first three months of 2016 was 16 cents, up 60 percent from 10 cents for the first three months
of 2015.

 


(Continued on Top Right Column)


Paint Rollers

The import total of paint rollers during March 2016 was 4.4 million, down 12 percent from 5 million for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 17 million paint rollers were imported, up 7 percent from 15.9 million during the first three months

of 2015.

China sent 13.1 million paint rollers to the United States during the first three months of 2016, while the Czech Republic exported 1.6 million, and Mexico shipped 1.3 million.

The average price per paint roller for March 2016 was 56 cents, up 10 percent from the average price for March 2015 of 51 cents. The average price for the first three months of 2016 was 49 cents, up

4 percent from 47 cents for the first three months of 2015.

 

Paintbrushes

U.S. companies imported 20.8 million paintbrushes during March 2016, down 14 percent from 24.1 million for March 2015. Paintbrush imports for the first three months of 2016 were 62.3 million, up 17 percent from 53.1 million for the first three months of 2015.

China shipped 59.8 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first three months of 2016.

The average price per paintbrush for March 2016 was 30 cents, down 6 percent from 32 cents for March 2015. The average price for the first three months of 2016 was also 30 cents, down

12 percent from 34 cents for the first three

months of 2015.

Upright Brooms

The total import of upright brooms for March 2016 was 1.3 million, up 18 percent from 1.1 million for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 4.6 million upright brooms were imported, up 35 percent from 3.4 million imported during the first three months of 2015.

China sent 4.1 million upright brooms to the United States during the first three months of 2016.

The average price per broom for March 2016 was $1.15, down 28 percent from the average price for March 2015 of $1.60. The average price per broom for the first three months of 2016 was $1.32, down 11 percent from $1.49 for the first three months

of 2015.


– EXPORTS –

Export totals for the first three months of 2016 were up in four categories outlined: brooms and brushes of vegetable materials, toothbrushes, shaving brushes and paintbrushes, compared to the first three months of 2015.

 

In March 2016, three categories outlined reported increases: brooms and brushes of vegetable materials, toothbrushes and paintbrushes, compared to March 2015.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials

The United States exported 6,527 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during March 2016, up 7 percent from the March 2015 total of 6,106 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first three months of 2016 were 17,231 dozen, up 9 percent from 15,783 dozen for the first three months of 2015.

The United States sent 6,987 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada during the first three months of 2016, and 2,451 to Australia.

The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $66.35 in March 2016, up 82 percent from $36.52 for March 2015. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first three months of 2016 was $56.98, up 50 percent from $37.98 for the average price per dozen for the first three months of 2015.

 

Toothbrushes

During March 2016, the United States exported 16.1 million toothbrushes, up 30 percent from the total recorded in March 2015 of 12.4 million. During the first three months of 2016, 51.2 million toothbrushes were exported, up 44 percent from 35.5 million exported during the first three months of 2015.

The United States exported 27.5 million toothbrushes to Canada, and 7.3 million to Mexico, during the first three months of 2016.

The average price per toothbrush for March 2016 was 41 cents, down 27 percent from 56 cents for March 2015. The average price per toothbrush for the first three months of 2016 was 38 cents, down 30 percent from 54 cents for the first three months of 2015.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States exported 1.7 million shaving brushes during March 2016, the same as exported for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 4 million shaving brushes were exported, up 14 percent from 3.5 million for the first three months of 2015.

Both Brazil and Canada imported 1.2 million shaving brushes from the United States during the first three months of 2016.

The average price per shaving brush for March 2016 was 95 cents, down 25 percent from the average price for March 2015 of $1.27. The average price for the first three months of 2016 was $1.17, down 6 percent from $1.24 for the first three months of 2015.

 

Artist Brushes
March 2016 exports of artist brushes totaled 674,583, down 33 percent from 1 million for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 2 million artist brushes were exported, down 31 percent from 2.9 million for the first three months

of 2015.

Canada received 1.3 million artist brushes from the United States during the first three months of 2016, while the United Kingdom imported 180,319.


The average price per artist brush was $4.25 during March 2016, up 53 percent from the average price for March 2015 of $2.77. For the first three months of 2016, the average price per artist brush was $3.88, up 48 percent from the average price for the first three months of 2015 of $2.62.

 

Paintbrushes

The export total of paintbrushes during March 2016 was 423,297, up 244 percent from 122,907 for March 2015. During the first three months of 2016, 752,035 paintbrushes were exported, up 100 percent from 376,117 for the first three months

of 2015.

Canada imported 497,196 paintbrushes from the United States during the first three months of 2016.


The average price per paintbrush for March 2016 was $3.49, down 77 percent from $15.10 for March 2015. The average price for the first three months of 2016 was $5.33, down 59 percent from $12.91 recorded for the first three months of 2015.


March 2016 Export Chart

 

Click here for entire March 2016

Import/Export Statistics




ABMA Celebration Issue

 



Industry News



Haviland Corporation Introduces The Sahara Squeegee

 

Sahara Squeegee

 

“Haviland Corporation began manufacturing concrete, paving, and epoxy squeegees more than 35 years ago. With advances in types of epoxies, asphalts, emulsions, and bitumens, the company became aware of the need for a squeegee that could be used safely and efficiently with hot applications. The Sahara Squeegee meets that need," according to a press release from the company.

The blade is a hybrid rubber that offers flexibility, malleability, clarity, temperature resistance and water resistance.

“The Sahara Squeegee blade remains stable up to 478° fahrenheit, and has a low reactivity with chemicals.

“The hybrid blade is resistant to ozone and UV attacks, and has excellent tensile and tear properties at high temperatures.” This squeegee is available as a flat blade or with six different serration depths.

Visit www.havilandcorp.com for more information.


 




Management Changes For Mount Joy Wire


Mt. Joy Wire

Ed Hollock Matt Tipping Brandt Rosche Steve Weems

 

President of Mount Joy Wire Corporation Ty Kreiger, has announced four management changes including promotions for Ed Hollock, of Wernersville, PA, to technical services manager and Matt Tipping, of Quarryville, PA, to process control manager. Krieger also announced the appointment of Brandt Rosche, of Mount Joy, PA, to quality assurance specialist, and Steve Weems, also of Mount Joy, to environmental
services technician.


Hollock is responsible for working and collaborating with customers on quality, research and development and new product development. He also works to improve in-house tracking of material, scheduling of orders and on-time delivery.


He joined the company in 1998 as quality manager, and held that position for five years. He then worked for Nelson Steel Products as a plant engineer, and Kalas Manufacturing as a process and quality engineer. Hollock rejoined Mount Joy Wire in 2013, and since then has been responsible for the design, training, and implementation of Mount Joy’s custom shop floor data
collection system.


Hollock, a graduate of Wilkes University where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in materials engineering, supervises the process control manager, director of quality, quality specialist and environmental services technician and reports to general manager Jon Stine.


Tipping, who joined Mount Joy Wire in 2004, has been a customer service manager and assistant manager, a supervisor and specialist in various manufacturing departments and an
environmental technician.

He spearheads quality improvement, upgrading the safety and increasing the efficiency of production processes in all of the company’s departments, managing laboratory technicians and supervising the wastewater treatment plant.


As quality assurance specialist, Rosche oversees the internal and external quality of the company’s products, and reports to Hollock. Rosche previously worked for Auntie Anne’s and American Axle & Manufacturing. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in industrial technology from Millersville University.

Weems, who attended the College of Professional Studies in Villanova, PA, is responsible for Mount Joy Wire’s environmental health and safety, continuous improvement, lean manufacturing and green initiatives, including sustainability.


Weems previously worked as a project manager for ABM Industries, in Malvern, PA, and as operations manager for ITW’s Thielex Division, in
Somerset, NJ.


The company manufactures all wire products in its Mount Joy facility and ships to customers across the globe.


Visit www.mjwire.com for more information.


 



Libman Company Celebrates 120th Anniversary
With ‘Embrace Life’s Messes’ Tour

 

Libman


“The Libman Company’s eight-week 'Embrace Life’s Messes' tour is an experiential marketing campaign that is an extension of Libman’s 2016 television and print ad campaign that's message reminds consumers to 'Remember the Moment,' even when those moments can create a physical mess.

"The message Libman wants to communicate is that Libman has consumers covered so they can enjoy the moment rather than fret about the mess,” according to a company press release.


The tour will end in Chicago on August 18. At the helm of the tour, is a team of two individuals serving as Libman brand ambassadors, who will drive the Libman-branded Ford Transit van to store openings, retail locations, local events, and national historic landmarks in 15 states. At the retail stops, shoppers will have the opportunity to see in-store product demos and participate in games to win Libman prizes.


The tour will be documented throughout the eight weeks with blog posts, photos and videos of the duo’s adventures on social media sites and on www.embracelifesmesses.com. Libman will also run a 120th Anniversary online sweepstakes — Embrace Life’s Messes — over the course of 12 weeks, that will give away 120 Libman product prize packages worth $120 each, and culminate with a grand prize that awards $1,200 to the winner. The sweepstakes began on June 26 and runs through September 17.


"The Libman Company started in 1896 with the mission: to make the finest, most durable wire-wound corn brooms. The family left Lithuania for the United States in the 1890s, landed in Chicago, and started life in the New World by peddling sundries from a pushcart, selling everything from brooms to clothes-pins. The old-fashioned corn broom was a top seller," according to a press release.


Today, Libman has a 1.1 million-square-foot facility located in Arcola, IL. “With the fourth generation of

family members who have come on board, they are as committed as their predecessors to providing

high-quality, American-made cleaning products including mops, brushes, cleaning tools, and brooms.”
The Libman Company is family-owned and has been making quality cleaning tools since 1896. The company manufactures products from brooms and mops to more specialized tools for kitchen and bathroom cleaning and industrial uses. Libman manufactures most of its products in the United States, including the company’s Wonder® Mop.

Visit www.libman.com for more information.



Mill-Rose Welcomes Brush Manufacturers And Suppliers

To Its 56th Annual Golf Outing


The Malish Corp. Honors Employee


Brush manufacturers and suppliers from around the world met recently in Cleveland, OH, for the 56th

annual Victor F. Miller Golf Tournament, held at Shaker Heights Country Club in Cleveland.

Over 65 representatives from the United States and countries from around the world attended, hosted by Mentor, OH-based The Mill-Rose Company in honor of the company’s past president, Victor F. Miller. Manufacturers and suppliers gathered during the week prior to the golf outing to discuss business trends and opportunities.

The Mill-Rose Company, founded in 1919, is a manufacturer of twisted-in-wire brushes used in nearly every type of industry throughout the world. Mill-Rose is a family-owned organization, now in its fourth generation.

Visit www.millrose.com for more information.

 

 


 

 

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