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BBM eNews

Jan13 Mainhead


By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine Associate Editor

 

R.E. Caddy & Company, of Greensboro, NC, celebrating 56 years in business this year, has been an exclusive sales representative for Southern Steel & Wire for more than 30 years, providing wire to companies that wind mops and brooms and that staple set brushes.

 

Reporting that business lately has been “up and down,” R.E. Caddy & Co. President Richard Caddy added, “Currently, we are selling more brush stapling wire to companies that staple set items, such as push brooms and scrub brushes.

 

“Brush stapling wire is a galvanized product and has some different characteristics than broom and mop winding wire. This particular type of wire has slightly different specifications and tensile ranges than tinned broom wire and diameter tolerances are pretty tight. However, these are routine issues and nothing that is difficult for Southern Steel & Wire to accomplish.”

 

R.E. Caddy & Company was founded by the late Richard Earl “Tip” Caddy Sr. in 1958, and also supplies processed broom corn, palmyra and yucca fiber; wood broom, brush and mop handles; wet mop hardware and handles; polyethylene broom sewing twine; nails, knives and other supplies.

 

Caddy

Richard Caddy

 

Steel prices and availability are critical to R.E. Caddy’s operation and in the recent past prices have fluctuated.

 

“We haven’t had any pricing issues in the past year, and I don’t see any indication that we are going to have any kind of increase in steel rod in the near term,” Caddy said. “In addition, availability of raw materials has been good.”

 

In addition, the quality of raw materials is important. According to Caddy, a durable finish resistant to corrosion is critical with staple stetting. Also, for broom and mop manufacturers, tensile strengths on wire used in these products are relatively high compared to brush staple wire. Wire used by broom and mop manufacturers must also have a nice finish because it is visible to the consumer.

 

Although they fluctuate somewhat, Caddy said freight costs remain higher than they were three or four years ago.

 

“Some months container prices are really high and some months it looks like they have calmed down,” he said. “Fuel costs have gone up and, depending on the economies overseas, there may or may not be an over-supply of containers that we want to bring to the United States.”

 

In recent years, as companies doing business overseas have dealt with unpredictable lead times, higher freight costs and product quality issues, the allure of importing has abated somewhat. This has gradually led to more manufacturing moving back onshore, as has been reported in some manufacturing segments.

 

“Some of our customers who buy reasonable quantities of wire still have overseas manufacturing, but many of them have brought more of it back to the United States,” Caddy said. “I don’t know of any companies that have completely quit importing, but they are making more brooms and mops here. The difference in labor costs between domestic and overseas operations is not quite as great as it used to be. There are delays in shipping. It could be that there are not enough containers coming this way, or maybe the containers are a lot more expensive. Therefore, it becomes less advantageous to import.

 

“It is always more difficult to maintain an operation half-way around the world. People must be sent over to constantly monitor and look at things. By manufacturing in the United States, companies can control business a little better.

 

“Nonetheless, domestic manufacturers remain challenged not to import because manufacturing stateside is not as easy as in the past. There are very few, if any, new companies popping up to make brushes and brooms.”

 

When it comes to customer service, Caddy explained, since its inception more than a half century ago, R.E. Caddy has emphasized communicating with customers to remain current on their operations and their needs.

 

“We establish relationships with customers to know what kind of materials they require, and to anticipate when they are going to need to order,” Caddy said. “Some people like to work plans with us in terms of blanket purchase orders. For others, we have ready inventory where we can ship fairly close to any date that an order is given — if not same day. We pay attention to our quality because that is important no matter what the application. We just try to treat our customers the best we can.”

 

Whether meeting customers’ needs with blanket orders or delivering orders in a timely manner, a certain amount of product must be available on demand. According to Caddy, in 35 years as acting as a sales rep for Southern Steel & Wire, there has never been a negative issue with product availability. Southern Steel & Wire is located in Madison, NC, just north of Greensboro.

 

In addition to offering wire for winding broom corn brooms, R.E. Caddy also supplies processed broom corn. Nearly all the broom corn imported into the United States comes from Mexico. In recent years, drug violence and drought in the Torreon region of Mexico, the main broom corn growing area of the country, have presented challenges for importers.

 

“We have had a little easier time the past 12 months getting the material and the quality we want than we had in 2011 and 2012,” Caddy said. “We don’t have the 2014 crop yet, that is still growing, but we are not that far off. Sometime in the next six to eight weeks, we will probably see some 2014 broom corn. The 2013 crop was pretty decent. Even what we are getting now, which is toward the end of the 2013 inventory, is still pretty nice broom corn. About this time last year, it was kind of dicey if we would have broom corn in adequate supply.

 

“It is still unsafe to travel to the growing regions, but it is probably not as wild as it was last year and the year before.

 

“Also, the drought conditions are not as bad. There has been some rain in other parts of Mexico other than the main growing region in Torreon. We have been able to get broom corn from those areas, which helps with the supply.”

 

Caddy expressed optimism about the future of his company and the market segments it serves.

 

“We will continue serving our customers as long as there are people out there making brushes, brooms and mops,” he said.

 

Contact: R.E. Caddy & Company, Inc.,
P.O. Box 14634, Greensboro, NC 27415.
Phone: 336-273-3609.
E-mail: sales@recaddy.com.
Website: www.recaddy.com.

 

 

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Ralph Rosenbaum, president of Stainless Steel Products, a division of RMR International Co., Inc., of Deer Park, NY, said the company is on its way to having one of its best years of sales in its history.

 

“Since 2009, business has been better every year than the year before,” Rosenbaum said.

 

SSP specializes in the sale of wire and value-added wire products to North and South American manufacturers and distributors.

 

Caddy

Ralph Rosenbaum

 

 

Since 1996, SSP has been manufacturing wire to customers’ specifications, while it stocks and distributes products for quick shipments and just-in-time deliveries.

 

The company offers high-fatigue resistant wire, including brush fills, staple wire, scratch brush wire, power brush wire, crimped wire, retaining wire, straightened and cut-to-length wire, winding wire, stranded wire and flat wire.

 

The company’s wire products are used in such applications as power brushes, scratch brushes, crimped and crimped wheel brushes, strip brushes and twisted-in-wire brushes. SSP also offers stainless steel and galvanized strip.

 

 

(Continued in top right column.)

In addition to the brush industry, SSP also services many other segments, including the manufacturers of cable, chains, custom specialty products, dental products, filters, flexible metal hose, jewelry, medical products, pool safety cover hardware, springs, staples, wire for thread and yarn, wire braid and wire cloth.

 

As it has for the past couple of years or so, sales of crimped filament brush wire have been a plus for SSP, according to Rosenbaum.

 

“We also sell to the heating element industry. These customers use a lot of our nickel chrome wire, nickel wire, and other wires as opposed to just stainless steel,” he said. “Sales of other more ‘exotic’ alloys have been helping us as well. As far as brush wire, many of our customers are doing the same, if not slightly better, than last year, and we have also acquired new brush customers.

 

“Many customers have come to us for stainless, and even some for carbon steel, but mostly stainless steel. We are trying to improve our capabilities for wires cut to length. This is an area in which we are focusing some productivity improvements. We anticipate that within the next month or two, capacity should pretty much double. We have a new machine coming online that is semi-automated. It is not going to be the end of the story, but it is going to be a good start for keeping up with our orders and improving our productivity."

 

Along with new machinery, SSP is planning to add one or two staff members during the third quarter of the year, Rosenbaum said.

 

On the raw material front, Rosenbaum said stainless steel pricing went through a period of large increases, but have stabilized recently.

 

“Prices were going up all year pretty much until the middle of May,” he said. “Prices have been stabilizing. I don’t see any problems with raw materials at this time and there is plenty of supply.”

 

An important part of SSP’s value-added customer service is its efforts with prototyping, innovations and working with customers to develop new products.

 

“We are involved in application engineering for many different industries,” Rosenbaum said. “As a company, we want to emphasize our Application Engineering Services™. With our knowledge, access to resources and metallurgy expertise in working on special projects for custom applications, we can accomplish a lot in this area. For example, I’m working with a surgeon in Canada who wants to reinvent the stent to minimize infections. He has his ideas how to do it, and I know the materials and structure of what he is looking for in order to accomplish the task. We will see what develops.

 

“We do a lot with high-temperature alloys and application engineering for this field, as well. This is definitely something we want to continue to do, because, many times, it is difficult to replicate custom solutions, which makes it good business for everybody.

 

“We want customers and potential customers to know we are interested in promoting our Application Engineering Services™ and providing working solutions.”

 

As for the future, Rosenbaum is optimistic.

 

“I am really looking forward to the next 18 months,” he said. “As long as the economy holds up, I think we should be able to deliver on increased demand with added capacity, and maintain our quality. It looks pretty good for us. But our focus is always to help our customers make their futures better, too.”

 

Contact: Stainless Steel Products,
561-T Acorn St., Deer Park, NY 11729.
Phone: 631-243-1500.
E-mail: sales@stainlesswires.com.

Website: www.stainlesswires.com.

 

 

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Offering more than 150 sizes of wire, WCJ Pilgrim Wire, of Glendale, WI, is a manufacturer and distributor of wire used in the manufacturing of brushes, brooms and related products.

 

One of the company’s important commitments to customers is to be nearby to meet their needs. In this vein, WCJ, in addition to its headquarters and a warehouse in the Milwaukee metro area, operates facilities throughout North America.

 

Facilities in the United States, Canada and Mexico are located in Montreal, QC; Toronto, ON; Vancouver, BC; Shelbyville, KY; Houston, TX; Laredo, TX; Los Angeles, CA; Seattle, WA; and Torreon, Mexico City and Monterey in Mexico.

 

In addition, WCJ Worldwide, The Wire Specialists, a Division of WCJ Wire, operates warehouses in Waterford, Ireland; West Yorkshire, The United Kingdom; Radom, Poland; Alicante, Spain; Bogota, Columbia; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Lima, Peru; Santiago, Chile; Cairo, Egypt; Shanghai, China; and Hong Kong.

 

WCJ Sales Manager Kristopher Shaw said business has been steady, as consumer confidence seems to be on the rise.

 

“However, our customers are not ordering in the amounts that they were in the past, and they are giving us less lead times,” Shaw said. “Our strategy is to be where the customers are, and try to plan ahead and use our software and order information the best we can. There are more buyers thinking about the bottom line, and it is one of those challenges we must face.”

 

WCJ Pilgrim Wire’s products are designed for every type of brush, broom or mop application on the market, according to the company. The company’s offerings include galvanized high and low carbon, stainless steel, nickel silver, brass coated, regular tempered, untempered steel, high fatigue and annealed wires.

 

Caddy

Kristopher Shaw

 

 

The company packages wire in straight hanks, crimped in hanks, crimped in coils or spools, straight in coils or spools, straight and crimped multi-stranded, and on stems and reels.

 

WCJ also offers stitching and baling wire products, and also sells raw materials for applications such as paper clips, industrial clamps, wire cables, clothes pins, bicycle spokes, springs, rivets, welding, weaving and more.

 

According to Shaw, raw materials the company uses include stainless, low carbon and high carbon steel. Currently, there are no issues with the availability of the steel the company needs. WCJ sources from U.S. rod. Some rod material also comes from overseas.

 

“Pricing is up and down, but it is currently more on the higher side,” he said. “We have seen that some of the wire rod companies are actually increasing rates. We will just have to see if we can get through it safely and smartly, and see what we can do to keep our customers happy. We will try not to raise prices too much and go from there.

 

“Basically, what we are trying to do is to help companies’ efficiencies by providing them with large size spools that will cut down on changeover costs. We have a new technology called the Smart Pull Wire System that utilizes the 800- and 1,600-pound wire spools.

 

“The concept is the spool always stays on its skid, so people aren’t reaching over picking something out and getting over-extended. The system reduces the amount of down time for wire changeovers by increasing efficiency. Also, it involves a new winding technique, resulting in a straighter wire. This means the wire will no longer have to be straightened when it goes into a machine. As a result, the machine doesn’t have to pull as hard to use the wire. What that does is cut down on maintenance costs and reduces parts wear. It is designed for medium to larger scale operations.”

 

Because customers are demanding shorter lead times, which WCJ’s stocking capabilities are able to facilitate, and other issues, such as higher freight costs and lack of quality control, Shaw is seeing more business coming back to the United States from overseas.

 

“There is always competition and the idea that a company can sometimes do things better overseas,” he said. “However, I think we are getting back in a situation where jobs are coming home, and that is a good thing. It is an ever-changing world, so one never really knows how things will play out, but we at WCJ feel good now, and we are looking forward to the challenges the future might bring.”

 

Contact: WCJ Pilgrim Wire,
4180 N. Port Washington Road,
Glendale, WI 53212. Phone: 414-291-9566.
Toll free: 888-672-2503.
Website: www.wcjwire.com.



 

 

Imports/Exports For First Three Months Of 2014 Mixed

import

Including complete list of March 2014

Import/Export Statistics

 

By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine Associate Editor

 

Import totals for the first three months of 2014 were down in four finished goods categories outlined: brooms and brushes of vegatable material, toothbrushes, hairbrushes and paintbrushes, compared to the same time period in 2013. In March 2014, five categories outlined recorded increases: brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents, toothbrushes, hairbrushes, paint rollers, and paintbrushes, compared to March 2013.


– RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS –


Hog Bristle

The United States imported 2,301 kilograms of hog bristle in March 2014, down 80 percent from 11,251 kilograms imported in March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 66,343 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, down 34 percent from 100,092 kilograms imported during the first three months of 2013.

 

China sent 66,312 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first three months of 2014, while Thailand shipped the remainder.

 

The average price per kilogram for March 2014 was $17.76, down 12 percent from the average price per kilogram for March 2013 of $20.24. The average price per kilogram for the first three months of 2014 was $12.92, down 4 percent from the average price per kilogram of $13.46 for the first three months of 2013.



Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles during March 2013 was 894,771, down 25 percent from 1.2 million for March 2012. During the first quarter of 2013, 3 million broom and mop handles were imported, down 12 percent from 3.4 million for the first quarter of 2012.

 

During the first quarter of 2013, the United States received 1 million broom and mop handles from Brazil, 654,133 from Indonesia, 649,537 from Honduras and 600,284 from China.

 

The average price per handle for March 2013 was 86 cents, up 28 percent from the average price for March 2012 of 67 cents. The average price for the first quarter of 2013 was 78 cents, down 1 cent from the first quarter of 2012.

Brush Backs

March 2014 imports of brush backs totaled 578,913, up 46 percent from 395,856 for March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 1.4 million brush backs were imported, up 27 percent from 1.1 million for the first three months of 2013.

 

Canada sent 680,375 brush backs to the United States during the first three months of 2014, while Sri Lanka shipped 582,733.

 

The average price per brush back was 45 cents during March 2014, down 15 percent from the average price for March 2013 of 53 cents. For the first three months of 2014, the average price per brush back was 48 cents, down 4 percent from 50 cents for the first three months of 2013.


Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles during March 2014 was 3.1 million, up 41 percent from 2.2 million for March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 6.1 million metal handles were imported, down 3 percent from 6.3 million for the first three months of 2013.

 

During the first three months of 2014, China exported 2.2 million metal handles to the United States, while Spain shipped 2 million and Italy sent 1.5 million.

 

The average price per handle for March 2014 was 71 cents, up 22 percent from 58 cents for March 2013. The average price for the first three months of 2014 was 93 cents, up 52 percent from the average price for the first three months of 2013 of 61 cents.


– FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS –


Brooms Of Broom Corn
Valued At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 699,521 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during March 2014, up 27 percent from 551,598 for March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 1.9 million brooms of broom corn were imported, the same as the first three months of 2013.

 

Mexico shipped nearly all the brooms to the United States during the first three months of 2014, with Honduras sending 5,940 and Italy exporting 3,320.

 

The average price per broom for March 2014 was $2.50, up 2 percent from the average price for March 2013 of $2.46. The average price per broom for the first three months of 2014 was $2.54, up 6 percent from $2.40 for the first three months of 2013.

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during March 2014 was 200,136, down 5 percent from 211,311 brooms and brushes imported during March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 425,718 brooms and brushes were imported, down 27 percent from 580,814 for the first three months of 2013.

 

Sri Lanka exported 265,520 brooms and brushes to the United States during the first three months of 2014, while Vietnam sent 57,950.

 

The average price per unit for March 2014 was $1.55, up 27 percent from $1.22 for March 2013. The average price for the first three months of 2014 was $1.75, up 40 percent from the average price recorded for the first three months of 2013 of $1.25.

Toothbrushes

The United States imported 73.9 million toothbrushes in March 2014, up 14 percent from 64.7 million imported in March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 228.4 million toothbrushes were imported, down 10 percent from 255.1 million imported during the first three months of 2013.

 

China sent 174.6 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first three months of 2014.

 

The average price per toothbrush for March 2014 was 26 cents, the same as for March 2013. The average price for the first three months of 2014 was 23 cents, up 1 cent from the first three months of 2013.

 

Hairbrushes

March 2014 imports of hairbrushes totaled 1.6 million, up 7 percent from the March 2013 total of 1.5 million hairbrushes. During the first three months of 2014, 7.2 million hairbrushes were imported, down 25 percent from 9.6 million for the first three months of 2013.

 

China shipped all the hairbrushes to the United States during the first three months of 2014.

 

The average price per hairbrush was 28 cents during March 2014, down 10 percent from the average price for March 2013 of 31 cents. For the first three months of 2014, the average price per hairbrush was 28 cents, the same as the average price for the first three months of 2013.

 

(Continued on Top Right Column)




Shaving Brushes

The United States imported 3.5 million shaving brushes in March 2014, down 3 percent from 3.6 million imported in March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 16.4 million shaving brushes were imported, up 9 percent from 15 million imported during the first three months of 2013.

 

China sent 11.2 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first three months of 2014, while Mexico shipped 1.7 million and Germany sent 1.6 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for March 2014 was 14 cents, down 1 cent from the average price for March 2013. The average price for the first three months of 2014 was 14 cents, up 1 cent from the average price for the first three months of 2013.

Paint Rollers

The import total of paint rollers during March 2014 was 4 million, up 67 percent from 2.4 million recorded for March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 11.7 million paint rollers were imported, up 4 percent from 11.3 million during the first three months of 2013.

 

China sent 8.6 million paint rollers to the United States during the first three months of 2014, while Mexico exported 2.3 million.

 

The average price per paint roller for March 2014 was 48 cents, down 28 percent from 67 cents for March 2013. The average price for the first three months of 2014 was 53 cents, up 4 percent from the average price recorded for the first three months of 2013 of 51 cents.

Paint Pads
The total import of paint pads for March 2014 was 1.3 million, down 7 percent from 1.4 million for March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 7.8 million paint pads were imported, up 70 percent from 4.6 million imported during the first three months of 2013.

 

China sent 7.6 million paint pads to the United States during the first three months of 2014.

 

The average price per paint pad for March 2014 was 36 cents, down 14 percent from the average price for March 2013 of 42 cents. The average price per paint pad for the first three months of 2014 was 22 cents, down 45 percent from 40 cents for the first three months of 2013.


Paintbrushes

U.S. companies imported 18.2 million paintbrushes during March 2014, up 4 percent from 17.5 million paintbrushes imported during March 2013. Paintbrush imports for the first three months of 2014 were 51.1 million, down 9 percent from 56.2 million recorded for the first three months of 2013.

 

China shipped 45.6 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first three months of 2014.

 

The average price per paintbrush for March 2014 was 33 cents, up 32 percent from 25 cents for March 2013. The average price for the first three months of 2014 was 30 cents, up 1 cent from the average price for the first three months of 2013.


– EXPORTS –

 

Export totals for the first three months of 2014 were down in three categories outlined: brooms and brushes of vegetable materials, toothbrushes and shaving brushes compared to the first three months of 2013. In March 2014, three categories outlined reported decreases: toothbrushes, shaving brushes and artist brushes compared to March 2013.

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials

The United States exported 6,949 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during March 2014, up 5 percent from the March 2013 total of 6,636 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first three months of 2014 were 16,470 dozen, down 11 percent from 18,514 dozen for the first three months of 2013.

 

The United States sent 6,255 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada during the first three months of 2014 and 1,620 dozen to Trinidad.

 

The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $41.89 in March 2014, down 4 percent from $43.67 for March 2013. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first three months of 2014 was $38.35, down 14 percent from the average price per dozen for the first three months of 2013 of $44.59.

Toothbrushes

During March 2014, the United States exported 11.6 million toothbrushes, down 28 percent from the total recorded in March 2013 of 16 million. During the first three months of 2014, 37.1 million toothbrushes were exported, down 24 percent from 49 million exported during the first three months of 2013.

 

The United States exported 12.1 million toothbrushes to Canada during the first three months of 2014, while sending 8.2 million toothbrushes to Mexico and 6.5 million to Germany.

 

The average price per toothbrush for March 2014 was 54 cents, up 17 percent from the average price for March 2013 of 46 cents. The average price per toothbrush for the first three months of 2014 was 48 cents, up 9 percent from 44 cents for the first three months of 2013.

Shaving Brushes

The United States exported 591,842 shaving brushes during March 2014, down 58 percent from 1.4 million shaving brushes exported for March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 3.5 million shaving brushes were exported, down 8 percent from 3.8 million during the first three months of 2013.

 

Mexico imported 1.6 million shaving brushes from the United States during the first three months of 2014, while Canada received 781,668 and Brazil imported 498,964.

 

The average price per shaving brush for March 2014 was $2.76, up 168 percent from the average price for March 2013 of $1.03. The average price for the first three months of 2014 was $1.30, up 44 percent from 90 cents recorded for the first three months of 2013.

Artist Brushes

March 2014 exports of artist brushes totaled 922,554, down 6 percent from the March 2013 total of 978,451 artist brushes. During the first three months of 2014, 2.4 million artist brushes were exported, the same as for the first three months of 2013.

 

Canada received 1.5 million artist brushes from the United States during the first three months of 2014.

 

The average price per artist brush was $2.38 during March 2014, up 7 percent from the average price for March 2013 of $2.23. For the first three months of 2014, the average price per artist brush was $2.79, up 11 percent from the average price for the first three months of 2013 of $2.52.

Paintbrushes

The export total of paintbrushes during March 2014 was 168,231, up 29 percent from 130,549 for March 2013. During the first three months of 2014, 351,178 paintbrushes were exported, up 9 percent from 322,187 during the first three months of 2013.

 

Canada imported 120,718 paintbrushes from the United States during the first three months of 2014.

 

The average price per paintbrush for March 2014 was $13.74, down 10 percent from $15.35 for March 2013. The average price for the first three months of 2014 was $16.24, down 4 percent from $17 recorded for the first three months of 2013.

 

 

2014 IE Data

 

Click here for entire March 2014 Export/Import Statistics

 

 



Osborn Introduces New Load Runners® Catalog

Osborn Logo

 

Osborn’s Load Runners division manufactures a full line of cam followers, idler rollers and rail products in both metric and imperial, stud- or yoke-style, ranging in outside diameter sizes up to 12 inches in plain, flanged and v-groove design. The company also designs and manufactures customized products — with special geometries, seals, lubrication and/or materials — to customer specifications.

 

A four-page overview brochure also is available.

 

Osborn is a supplier of surface treatment solutions and finishing tools for industrial and commercial applications such as metal finishing, honing and surface polishing. Osborn celebrated its 125th anniversary in 2012. The company now has operations in 15 countries and serves customers in more than 100 countries.

 

Visit www.loadrunners.com for more information.

 


 

 

 

 



Shurhold Manufactures Hand-held Tools
With RV Owners In Mind

 

Shurhold RV Tools

Shurhold's line of RV cleaning tools, clockwise from top left, include the Wash Mitt, Hose Nozzle, Utility Brush, Super T Sponge,
Detailing Brush, Scrub Brush, Bug and Tar Remover Sponge, Long and Short Dip & Scrub Brushes.

 

 

Shurhold Industries’ line of hand-held RV cleaning tools includes the Scrub Brush, which has a soft handle with finger grips and a safety bumper. The Utility Brush can be used on upholstery, floor mats, vinyl and canvas. The Dip & Scrub Brush has stiff, chemical-resistant bristles made of polypropylene. It’s available in short and long versions.

 

Manufactured with teak in mind, Shurhold’s Detailing Brush has stainless steel bristles with a medium stiffness for removal of grease and grime.

 

The extra-large Super T Sponge is designed with a t-shaped top for a better grip and to make washing easier. Shurhold’s Bug and Tar Remover Sponge is a non-abrasive, mesh-covered sponge that is recommended for removing tar, grit, bugs, stains and grime.

 

Shurhold says its Wash Mitt is made from soft, synthetic and absorbent fibers. Whether used wet or dry, the mitt’s shaped thumb and elastic band base enable a comfortable and snug fit.

 

"Microfiber towels from Shurhold are soft and absorbent and will not scratch delicate surfaces,” said company representatives.

 

The ergonomically-shaped, die-cast zinc Hose Nozzle body has a soft, black, vinyl grip for a comfortable hold. It includes a hold-open clip for constant water flow and has a stainless steel spring.

 

Visit www.shurhold.com/rv for more information.

 


 

 



New Applications Sales Engineer Named
To Head PFERD Mobile Training Program


Jeffrey Kwansy, newly named head of PFERD’s Tool Mobile Program comes to the company from AkzoNobel, a packaging coatings firm in Strongsville, OH, where he served as a technical service representative. He reports directly to John Thompson, PFERD’s national technical sales manager.

 

Kwansy is originally from Ohio and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Kent State University. His work experience includes time as a technician with ICI Paints, in Strongsville. As the program expands in the United States, PFERD plans to launch more Tool Mobiles with additional applications sales engineers under Kwansy’s direction.

 

PFERD INC. is the U.S. subsidiary of August Rüggeberg GmbH & Co. of Marienheide, Germany, a 215-year-old company in the design and manufacture of abrasive products, cutting tools, industrial and maintenance brushes and power tools. ADVANCE BRUSH is a subsidiary of PFERD INC.

 

 

PFERD Tool Mobile

New PFERD Applications Sales Engineer, Jeffrey Kwansy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 2014 Calendar