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BBM eNews

Sept Mainhead


Editor’s Note: Borghi S.p.A., of Castelfranco Emilia, Italy, and Boucherie N.V., of Izegem, Belgium, have issued the following joint release.

 

Borghi S.p.A., of Castelfranco Emilia, Italy, and Boucherie N.V., of Izegem, Belgium, recently announced that they are joining forces. The announcement states the decision will allow them to “better serve the global brush industry and to jointly develop their technology.” Borghi originated in 1949. Boucherie began in 1928.

 

Boucherie is one of the world’s largest companies in the production of brush manufacturing equipment. It is a pioneer in the development of new technologies for manufacturing brushes and toothbrushes as well as cosmetic brushes, interdental brushes and other small sized specialty brushware.

 

Boucherie has experience in producing precision, high-speed brush manufacturing equipment and is known for its innovation. Boucherie is also recognized as a global technology leader in the development, design and construction of complex, single- and multi-component injection moulds with several patents under its name.


 

(Continued in top right column.)

 

 

 

 


Borghi is globally known for its innovative and quality brush manufacturing equipment made for the household broom and brush sector, the janitorial brush sector as well as the industrial and technical brush manufacturing segments of the brush industry.

 

With a strong global presence via its many satellite facilities and agents, Borghi covers the world and especially the major brush industry markets with fast and efficient customer service. Borghi also produces equipment for the production of strip and twisted in wire brushes, mops, as well as trimming, flagging and finished machinery and accessories.

 

More news is expected to be released in the future as Borghi and Boucherie bring forth further details of their collaboration.


 

Story 2

By Harrell Kerkhoff, Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine Editor

 

Managing a company’s brand is a full-time endeavor, one which can lead to continued success or eventual failure. Branding is more than a logo, a color, a slogan, an identity, or a representation from quality employees within an organization – it’s all of these things and more.

 

“Corporate Branding” was the theme of the recent 97th American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA) Annual Convention. The event featured a two-part presentation on branding by guest speaker Ira Blumenthal. He is president of Co-Opportunities, Inc., an Atlanta, GA-based consulting company that has counseled such clients as Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Disney and Walmart.

 

Jan Haviland

Ira Blumenthal

 

Blumenthal delivered a keynote address at the Annual Convention and later conducted a corporate branding workshop. He stressed during the keynote address the importance of branding for any company, no matter its size. He added that many companies over the years have gone from “distinction” to “extinction,” in part because they lost their brand focus for growth and change.

 

“There are (company executives) who believe this won’t happen to (their companies). It’s important to remember, however, that change is inevitable, growth is optional,” he said.

 

Many successful companies have changed their brand identity over the course of changing times. One example Blumenthal gave was the fast-food chain “KFC,” which was formerly known as “Kentucky Fried Chicken.” The name change took place after a major study was released that indicated eating fried food was unhealthy. Therefore, the word “fried” was eliminated from the company’s branding focus.

 

“This is all about marketing and branding. (The restaurant chain) repositioned the company, called it ‘KFC’ and started marketing grilled chicken. Why? Simply because people started eating healthier,” Blumenthal said.

 

He added many global companies have recognized the importance of changing their corporate brand focus as times change. For example, Coca-Cola recently began working with a maker of coffee brewers to help introduce a system for producing single-serve carbonated soda at home.

 

“This is a dramatic change in brand positioning. Look at the evolution of Coca-Cola. Over its long history, it has supplied product through a soda fountain, with glass bottles and then aluminum cans, with the help of a push-button computer-generated freestyle cartridge dispenser that now provides over 150 beverage choices, and its current plans for a home device. It’s all about evolution,” Blumenthal said.

 

Keeping a company’s brand healthy in today’s fast-paced world requires constant evolution as technology continues to change people’s viewing habits. Blumenthal discussed what is known as “critical mass.”

 

“This is when 50 million Americans have something,” he said. “For example, it took the telephone 25 years to reach critical mass (1920 to 1945), the television 13 years (1951 to 1964), cable television 10 years (1976 to 1986), the Internet 5 years (1993 to 1998), Facebook 2 years (2004 to 2006), and Twitter less than 1 year (2006 to 2007).

 

“This shows that change is coming faster than ever before. Business can pass you by if you don’t have a great brand strategy and find ways to constantly evolve your brand.”

 

He spoke of key words that have helped companies keep their corporate brand focus current such as “proactive,” “empowerment,” and “multi-tasking.” He then focused on the word, “paradigm.”

 

“A paradigm is a model, a standard, a snapshot. For example, when I was in high school, the paradigm was that a boy would ask a girl out on a date. Today, it’s also OK for a girl to ask a boy. The paradigm has changed,” Blumenthal said.

 

He added that today’s paradigms present issues at hand as well as opportunities. A company, therefore, should be willing to change as paradigms change. A paradigm paralysis is when a company continues to do the same things simply because they have been standard practices over the years.

 

“This is not to say that something done in the past is necessarily wrong, but you have to constantly rethink your model,” Blumenthal said “For example, Alexander Graham Bell’s invention logically evolved into the cell phone. The original focus of the phone centered on the ears and mouth. Today, the focus is on the thumbs. It’s about constantly rethinking your brand. If you want to be successful, you need to be a change master.”

 

To help make his point, Blumenthal quoted the late Peter Druker, well known as a management consultant, educator and author, who said, “The best way to predict the future is to create it.”

 

Blumenthal discussed different individuals who had successfully formed a vision for the future which created a greater need for their products. Such examples included Ted Turner’s focus on creating a 24-hour news station known as CNN, and executives at Coca-Cola and McDonald’s who worked together to help implement the use of drive-up windows for fast food distribution. These examples succeeded despite many naysayers.

 

Brands Shape The World

A company’s identity is often long associated with the type of brand it has relayed to the public. Therefore, Blumenthal said it’s vital that company officials realize the importance of branding.

 

“You get up in the morning and brush your teeth with a branded toothpaste, wash your body with branded soap, put on a branded shirt and get into your branded car. Life is all about brands, whether you like it or not,” Blumenthal said. “Brands stand for something. For example, Hallmark Cards has positioned its brand as the ‘best’ greeting cards available. The company’s slogan is, ‘When you care enough to send the very best.’”


(Continued in top right column.)

 

 

 

 


According to Blumenthal, there are only two real activities in business – selling and supporting the seller. He added that everybody working at a company is a “brand manager,” whether his/her business card shows that specific title nor not. He stressed that great companies empower everyone to help support, nurture and grow the brand. He also said there are only two things a person can do with a brand — polish it or tarnish it.

 

“I don’t care if you are the president, sales rep, general manager, truck driver or receptionist. Your real function and responsibility is for the care, protection, nurture and growth of your brand. Brands can only be polished or tarnished,” Blumenthal said. “Henry David Thoreau wrote in Walden: ‘Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each other’s eyes for an instant.’ What are your customers seeing? You might think your company is portrayed as being good, responsive, receptive, innovative and/or visionary, but is this accurate?

 

“What do you stand for? This may seem like a simple statement, but it’s not. You have to figure this out. What makes you unique? What is it about your company that people will remember? It’s better to be remembered than to be recalled. When someone sees your logo, is there a positive and instant cognition taking place? Great branding can include a color, a word, a phrase and/or a logo.”

 

A brand is the personality of a company, according to Blumenthal. The brand is also a promise. This is true whether a company is involved in the brush business, the soda business, the restaurant business, the oil business, etc.

 

“It’s a promise to customers that they are going to get a good product at a fair price, delivered when they need it, etc. Brand is ‘cognition,’ which is a fancy word for ‘understanding,’” he said. “It’s important to have people understand what you (and your company) represent and stand for. It’s also an absolute relationship. There is a reason some people were raised in ‘Ford (automobile) families.’ There are also people who only use one type of toothpaste, one type of soda drink, etc.”

 

Consistency in a company’s brand message is also important. Blumenthal noted that for the past 37 years, McDonald’s has only used one marketing phrase in its branding – “You Deserve A Break Today.”

 

He said people become loyal to companies that keep their promises. A consistent brand reminds these people of the company’s kept promises.

 

“Communicate with consistency. Everything communicates – the way we answer the phone, the way a work station looks, the way an invoice looks. If you exhibit at a trade show, you want to make sure your booth looks good. Why? Because everything communicates,” Blumenthal said. “Your brand in the brush industry should be absolutely consistent with everything else you show – from your invoices to your Website to your business cards, etc. Again, everything communicates.”

 

It’s also important to realize that it’s impossible to be all things to all people. Therefore, when it comes to branding, company officials must figure out what their company truly stands for and then try to be the absolute best in that area of specialty. He called this “brand focus and sacrifice.”

 

“Think about what you are promising your customers and then deliver on that promise. What is your position? Is it providing high-end or low-end products? How do you build your credibility? What about recognition and association? Joining this association (ABMA) is part of your credibility. It says you care enough about your industry and trade that you are here to learn and grow. This is all part of your brand option,” Blumenthal said. “You have to rethink your business over and over again.”

 

 

Brand Identity Vs. Brand Image

Honestly looking at a brand is sometimes like looking at a photo of oneself – reality can be cruel. According to Blumenthal, there is a difference between “brand identity” and “brand image.”

 

“Brand identity is what you believe your company is all about. You may say, ‘Our brand identity is family, tradition and quality.’ You stress these points in your PowerPoint presentations and brochures,” Blumenthal said. “Brand image is what (those in the outside world including customers) actually feel about your company. This can be dramatically different than brand identity. Sometimes it’s hard to come to grips with your company’s true brand image.”

 

It’s therefore important to always present a positive representation of your company – all in an effort to better shape its brand.

 

“For example, it was decided at Coca-Cola that sales people should not visit an account without bringing with them an idea, some data, a great article, information, an introduction, etc.,” he said. “Coca-Cola officials decided that they wanted their brand image to be that of a purveyor of ideas, information, access and solutions, not, ‘Here comes that peddler again trying to sell me more syrup.’”

 

Therefore, it’s important company leaders ask themselves, “What makes our company special? What is our ‘X’ factor?”

 

The same can be true for individual employees. They are, themselves, part of the company’s brand.

 

“If one of your drivers or customer service people does something negative, it’s not about him or her, it’s about your brand,” Blumenthal said. “How do you want to be perceived as a sales person when you walk into a customer’s office? There is a great quote I heard many years ago, ‘To be successful in sales, you must be perceived as a non-paid member of your customer’s staff.’ They must trust you and see you as an extension of their own business.”

 

Blumenthal spent some time in his remarks to address “personal branding.” He shared that people are brands too, and everyone needs to care for his/her personal brand as if it was a product or service. He said it’s possible for a person to change his/her own “negative brand.” The first step is to be aware that the negative brand exists.

 

Whether it’s a product, service, company or a personal brand, Blumenthal stressed that constantly working to “raise the bar” and improve a brand is vital for brand longevity and success.

 

“It’s all about what you want to be known for and how you position yourself,” Blumenthal said.

 

It can also be helpful to ask other people, such as customers, for their advice when it comes to company and personal branding.

 

“You can ask a customer, ‘What do you think of when you see me coming into your office?’” Blumenthal said. “(Branding) is about trust, solutions and working smarter.”

 

Visit www.iraspeak.com for more information.


 

Story 2

 

Editors Note: The following article was supplied to Broom, Brush & Mop from Gordon Brush.

 

Estranged from his parents and living with his grandparents at the age of 12, Ricardo Ruiz had to endure severe economic hardship due to the ravages of political unrest in his native country, El Salvador. Warring rebel factions recruiting young males, killing those who wouldn't join, made life intolerable for Ruiz to have the freedom to continue his studies.

 

“I was studying Industrial Engineering at the university and I was afraid that the political turmoil would make for an uncertain future, so I decided to seek better opportunities,” Ruiz said.

 

Along with a friend, who had family in Canada, Ruiz left El Salvador at the age of 21.

 

Traveling north by bus, train, and boat, the two crossed into California on their way to Canada, but they were stopped at the border and sent to a detention facility in Chula Vista, CA. Fearing deportation after his petition for asylum was rejected for insufficient evidence, Ruiz spent three days in detention before an aunt living in Montebello, CA, paid a fee for his release. Upon his release, he was given a work permit.

 

Ruiz was encouraged by his aunt’s husband to apply for a job at Gordon Brush Mfg. Co., Inc., where he (the uncle) was employed. Ruiz was hired as a janitor, because at the time, he didn't speak English and his educational training in El Salvador was not relevant to an open position at Gordon Brush. Ruiz spent two years as a janitor, all the while learning new skills, how to work and repair the machines on his own time.

 

“I wanted to better myself. I knew I had the capability of learning and improving my position and if I worked hard, someone would recognize my abilities,” Ruiz said.

 

After two years, Ruiz was given an opportunity to learn how to make brushes on the second shift. Ruiz still wasn't satisfied; he wanted more responsibility and better, higher paying jobs. Because Ruiz was a hard and conscientious worker, the company sponsored his United States citizenship. A couple of years passed when Bill Loitz, the son of the owner (at the time), recognized Ruiz’s ability and took him under his wing. He was made second shift supervisor and was taught the art of brush making and, how to use and repair all the machines.

 

As his English improved, Ruiz enrolled in community college to study architecture and accounting. Now married with a child, he was faced with a dilemma, asking himself, “Should I continue my education and pursue a career as an architect or should I stay at Gordon Brush?”

 

Ruiz says he asked his wife. The answer became clear when Ken Rakusin, the company president/CEO, and Loitz offered him the position of plant manager. Rakusin said, “Ruiz is the epitome of the American dream. He’s a model for every immigrant who comes to this great country, not knowing the language and culture, but willing and eager to put in the hard work, with desire, drive, and determination to grow and succeed and to make a better life for himself and his family, for Gordon Brush, and the community in which he resides.”

 

 


(Continued in top right column.)

Why did Ruiz stay at Gordon Brush rather than pursue a career as an architect?

 

“I stayed at Gordon Brush because I enjoy working with my hands, solving problems, and providing customers with a solution. I know that when a part is shipped from the Gordon Brush plant, the part will meet or exceed all of the specifications and performance expectations of our customer. It gives me great satisfaction to know that I contributed to the customer’s success,” Ruiz said.

 

Initially Ruiz’s role as plant manager was difficult; not from a work standpoint but from a personnel standpoint. Employees were jealous of Ruiz because he was promoted ahead of some with more seniority. However, Ruiz showed that he was there to help them succeed and work to do what was in the best interests of the company.

 

Fifteen years later as the manager, the plant runs smoothly as Ruiz, 52, manages the coordination of the production of over 15,000 different brushes made by Gordon Brush.

 

“I have complete faith and trust in Ruiz to do whatever he needs to do to run the plant in the most efficient and cost-effective manner, to make and deliver our wide variety of American made brushes to our customers,” Rakusin says.

 

Ruiz continues to give back to the system that gave to him. He is active in his church and community center. He counsels young people urging them to listen to their parents or others who have more experience, and to stay in school and get an education.

 

“Besides my family and my job, this is my third greatest satisfaction; being able to give back to the community and hopefully make a difference in a youth’s life,” he says.

 

Does he have any regrets?

 

“I have no regrets whatsoever. Gordon Brush is my home away from home and the employees are my extended family. Gordon Brush is a great place to work, to learn and grow, and to have the ability to raise a family. Because of Gordon Brush, I was able to build a great life for my wife and our two daughters; His older daughter is a college graduate, and the other is in her second year of college,” he said. “The company has been a home to many other immigrants and their offspring for over 60 years. Seeing second generation employees at Gordon Brush proves that this is a great place to work.”

 

Gordon Brush has been featured on the ION Network, Discovery Channel, Bloomberg News, and in the Los Angeles Times. The company also received Member Resolution No. 1402, sponsored by Senator Ronald S. Calderon, 30th California State Senate District. The company is an ISO 9001:2008 certified manufacturer.

Story 2

Shown, left to right, are Bill Loitz, executive vice president; Ricardo Ruiz, plant manager; and Ken Rakusin,
president and CEO of Gordon Brush.

 

 


 

Imports/Exports For First Month Of 2014 Mostly Down

 

 

Imports Exports Graphic

Including complete list of January 2014

Import/Export Statistics

 

By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine Associate Editor

 

U.S. government trade figures for the first month of 2014 indicated raw material imports were down in three categories outlined: hog bristle, broom and mop handles and metal handles, compared to the first month of 2013.

 

Import totals for the first month of 2014 were down in six finished goods categories outlined: brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents, brooms and brushes of vegetable material, toothbrushes, hairbrushes, paint rollers and paintbrushes, compared to the first month of 2013.


– RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS –


Hog Bristle

The United States imported 52,081 kilograms of hog bristle during the first month of 2014, down 15 percent from 61,547 kilograms imported during the first month of 2013.

 

China sent 52,050 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first month of 2014.

 

The average price per kilogram for the first month of 2014 was $9.38, up 7 percent from the average price per kilogram of $8.75 for the first month of 2013.

Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles to the United States during the first month of 2014 was 1.2 million, down 8 percent from 1.3 million for the first month of 2013.

 

During the first month of 2014, the United States received 658,811 broom and mop handles from Brazil, 250,057 from Honduras and 219,500 from China.

 

The average price for the first month of 2014 was 88 cents, up 11 percent from 79 cents for the first month of 2013.


Brush Backs

During the first month of 2014, 393,059 brush backs were imported to the United States, up 75 percent from 224,629 for the first month of 2013.

 

Sri Lanka shipped 217,268 brush backs to the United States during the first month of 2014, while Canada sent 116,991.

 

For the first month of 2014, the average price per brush back was 44 cents, down 17 percent from 53 cents for the first month of 2013.


Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles to the United States during the first month of 2014 was 1.6 million, down 20 percent from 2 million for the first month of 2013.

 

During the first month of 2014, China exported 999,606 metal handles to the United States, while Spain shipped 314,496 and Italy sent 175,476.

 

The average price for the first month of 2014 was $1.15, up 95 percent from the average price for the first month of 2013 of 59 cents.


– FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS –


Brooms Of Broom Corn
Valued At Less Than 96 Cents

The total import of brooms of broom corn valued at less than 96 cents per broom to the United States for the first month of 2014 was 4,056, up 22 percent from 3,336 imported during the first month of 2013.

 

All the brooms were imported from Mexico.

 

The average price per broom for the first month of 2014 was 82 cents, down 4 percent from 85 cents from the first month of 2013.


Brooms Of Broom Corn
Valued At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 607,245 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during the first month of 2014, down 14 percent from 705,863 for the first month of 2013.

 

Mexico shipped 602,605 brooms to the United States during the first month of 2014.

 

The average price per broom for the first month of 2014 was $2.54, up 8 percent from $2.36 for the first month of 2013.

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material to the United States during the first month of 2014 was 117,554, down 30 percent from 168,063 for the first month of 2013.

 

Sri Lanka exported 69,662 brooms and brushes to the United States during the first month of 2014, while Vietnam sent 22,950.

 

The average price per unit for the first month of 2014 was $2.02, up 62 percent from the average price recorded for the first month of 2013 of $1.25.

Toothbrushes

The United States imported 83.2 million toothbrushes during the first month of 2014, down 24 percent from 109.5 million imported during the first month of 2013.

 

China sent 65.8 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first month of 2014.

 

The average price per toothbrush for the first month of 2014 was 21 cents, up 11 percent from 19 cents for the first month of 2013.

 

Hairbrushes

During the first month of 2014, 3.5 million hairbrushes were imported to the United States, down 19 percent from 4.3 million for the first month of 2013.

 

All the hairbrushes were imported from Mexico.

 

For the first month of 2014, the average price per hairbrush was 28 cents, down 7 percent from 30 cents for the first month of 2013.

 

(Continued on Top Right Column)




Shaving Brushes

The United States imported 8 million shaving brushes during the first month of 2014, up 5 percent from 7.6 million imported during the first month of 2013.

 

China sent 6 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first month of 2014, while Germany shipped 1.2 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for the first month of 2014 was 14 cents, up 56 percent from 9 cents for the first month of 2013.

Paint Rollers

The import total of paint rollers to the United States during the first month of 2014 was 4.2 million, down 14 percent from 4.9 million during the first month of 2013.

 

China sent 3 million paint rollers to the United States during the first month of 2014, while Mexico exported 866,872.

 

The average price per paint roller for the first month of 2014 was 62 cents, up 41 percent from the average price recorded for the first month of 2013 of 44 cents.


Paintbrushes

U.S. companies imported 18.1 million paintbrushes during the first month of 2014, down 7 percent from 19.4 million recorded for the first month of 2013.

 

China shipped 17.1 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first month of 2014.

 

The average price per paintbrush for the first month of 2014 was 28 cents, down 15 percent from 33 cents for the first month of 2013.


– EXPORTS –

 

Export totals for the first month of 2014 were down in three categories outlined: toothbrushes, artist brushes and paintbrushes compared to the first month of 2013.


Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials

The United States exported 6,531 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first month of 2014, up 18 percent from 5,542 dozen for the first month of 2013.

 

The United States sent 1,947 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada during the first month of 2014 and 1,620 dozen to Trinidad.

 

The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first month of 2014 was $32.90, down 17 percent from the average price per dozen for the first month of 2013 of $39.55.


Toothbrushes

The United States exported 13.9 million toothbrushes during the first month of 2014, down 25 percent from 18.6 million exported during the first month of 2013.

 

The United States exported 4.8 million toothbrushes to Canada during the first month of 2014, while sending 2.9 million toothbrushes to Mexico, 2.8 million to Germany and 1.3 million to South Korea.

 

The average price per toothbrush for the first month of 2014 was 40 cents, down 13 percent from 46 cents for the first month of 2013.

Shaving Brushes

The United States exported 2.2 million shaving brushes during the first month of 2014, up 69 percent from 1.3 million during the first month of 2013.

 

Mexico imported 1.6 million shaving brushes from the United States during the first month of 2014, while Canada received 324,636 and Brazil imported 140,476.

 

The average price for the first month of 2014 was 66 cents, down 7 percent from 71 cents recorded for the first month of 2013.

Artist Brushes

During the first month of 2014, the United States exported 641,188 artist brushes, down 23 percent from 833,515 for the first month of 2013.

 

Canada received 341,500 artist brushes from the United States during the first month of 2014.

 

For the first month of 2014, the average price per artist brush was $3.78, up 54 percent from the average price for the first month of 2013 of $2.46.

Paintbrushes

The export total of paintbrushes from the United States during the first month of 2014 was 85,751, down 10 percent from 94,820 for the first month of 2013.

 

Canada imported 45,967 paintbrushes from the United States during the first month of 2014, while The Netherlands received 11,483.

 

The average price per paintbrush for the first month of 2014 was $16.64, down 4 percent from $17.29 recorded for the first month of 2013.

 

JAn14 IE Data

 

Click here for January 2014 Import/Export Statistics.

 

 

 




Jones Companies Honored With TBR Chancellor’s Award

 

NY Times Brush With Disaster

 

Pictured left to right are JSCC President Dr. Bruce Blanding, JCL CFO Richard Ayers, JCL President/CEO Ralph Jones III,
and Tennessee Vice Chancellor for Community Colleges Dr. Warren Nichols.

 

Jones Companies, Ltd., of Humboldt, TN, received The Chancellor’s Award for Philanthropy on April 25 from Jackson State Community College (TN) and the Tennessee Board of Regents. This award was created to honor the individuals, companies and organizations that continue to donate their resources, finances, and personal time to TBR institutions.

 

A formal ceremony was held at the Humboldt Center for Higher Education. Dr. Warren Nichols, vice chancellor for community colleges, presented the award to Ralph Jones III and Richard Ayers, of Jones Companies, on behalf of TBR. Dr. Bruce Blanding, president of Jackson State Community College, and Randy McKinnon, chairman of Jackson State Community College Foundation, represented JSCC and the Foundation.

 

“Jones Companies exemplifies dedication to education. We can truly say that Jones Companies, Ltd., is a supporter of Jackson State Community College and the Foundation,” Nichols said.

 

Jones Companies was recognized as an instrumental part of the success of the Humboldt Center for Higher Education through its financial support and community initiatives.

 

Jones Companies has been a supporter of non-traditional student scholarships at JSCC and the scholarship banquet. The company makes scholarship support available to its employees and their families. Jones Companies’ chief financial officer has served on the JSCC Foundation board of trustees for over six years and also serves on the business, investment and finance subcommittee.

 

Since 1936, Jones Companies, Ltd., has been a leading employer in Humboldt and west Tennessee. The company continually supports the local economy and encourages leadership roles of its associates in the community. The company was formed through a partnership between two brothers and today is led by a third generation with the same commitment. From the early days of operation, Jones has been one of the industry's largest processors of recycled textile by-products. Yarns for wet mopping, dry mopping and specialty cleaning applications constitute their primary focus.

 

The Jackson State Community College Foundation is an independent fundraising organization that has been making scholarships and additional operating funds available for JSCC and its students for a number of years. The Foundation is instrumental in providing necessary funding to assist students with educational expenses, but it also provides much needed assistance to the college. The Foundation helps in raising funds for equipment and projects for which there is not adequate funding from state funds.

 

“We have some generous benefactors from the community who understand the importance of Jackson State’s role in the community,” Dee Henderson, executive director of the Foundation, said. “Many projects would not be possible without the help of benefactors such as Jones Companies.”

 

Visit www.jonesyarn.com.

 


 

 

Sept 2013 Calendar