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Briarwood Vice President Manfred Tomm, left, is shown with his father, Erwin Tomm,
the company's founder and president.



By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

 

Briarwood Products Company, of Cleveland, OH, was originally founded in June 1965 as Accurate Mold & Die Company by Erwin Tomm, the company’s current president, and specializes in the manufacturing of laborsaving and more practical cleaning tools for the janitorial/sanitation industry.

 

According to Tomm, Briarwood’s philosophy is to be committed to serving customers by providing premium, cost-effective products. As a manufacturer, the company listens to the needs of the consumer and continually develops new products in response to these specific needs.

 

“We specialize in developing new tools. We build the molds for the plastic injection molding of the parts, and then we sell the completed tools to distributors,” said Briarwood Vice President Manfred Tomm, Erwin Tomm’s son, during a recent interview with Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine. “This is what we are good at and has been our niche market. We focus on labor-saving tools, which is key nowadays as companies are looking to cut labor costs. This
is one way we differentiate the company from other manufacturers of cleaning tools.

 

“We operate out of two facilities. We purchased one facility in the beginning, and, over the years, we grew to where it became necessary to lease another building, which is a short distance from the original facility. The leased building is almost five times the size of our first facility. The original facility houses our factory, and the larger facility is for warehousing, inventory, and some molding and assembling.


Long-time mold maker Louie Chodkiewicz.

 

“Business has been rebounding since 2009 and it looks like 2011 will be a record year for us. We have seen some buyers coming back from lower-cost overseas countries, and that has been nice. We manufacture the products and we have no problem with smaller orders, which can save a customer from having to invest in a container load from overseas.”

 

Product Lineup A ‘Good Mix’

 

Briarwood’s product offerings fall under several categories including wet mop holders, dry dust equipment, sweeping equipment, Adjust-A-Turn™ cleaning tools, painters tools and metal-free correctional facility tools. Other products include extension poles, microfiber tools, scrubbing brushes, and the Hi-Rib wall-washing tool.

 

“We make cleaning tools for commercial cleaners, and we are molding some medical and clean room tools, all of which have diversified our product lineup,” Manfred Tomm said. “Our cleaning tools used in correctional facilities are all plastic. These tools can be used in any metal-free environment.

 

“We recently came out with our microfiber surface cleaning tools that we offer in 18- and 24-inch sizes. There are many similar products in the market made with aluminum bases, but ours is made from plastic. To make it a better product, we have made a more ‘aggressive’ hook and loop fastener to eliminate the problem of it not adhering to the microfiber pads when they are wet.”

 

New products include:
• Contour Wiz — Flexible microfiber cleaning tool for uneven surfaces contours and bathtubs;
• Cam-Lock™ Threaded Tips — According to Briarwood, patented design keeps brush and broom handles from becoming loose;
• FLIP-LOCK™ Extension Poles — Professional quality extension poles that make it possible to perform up-in-the-air tasks without a ladder;
• Adjust-N-Dust — Duster will bend to any position. Can dust large areas in a single swipe. Easy-to-change microfiber sleeves sold separately; and
• Wide-Swath Dust Mop Frame Connector — Designed for gym floors, halls and other large areas.

 

Manfred Tomm explained the company’s products are not necessarily the cheapest as they are designed and manufactured with maximum quality in mind to make them efficient laborsaving tools. This quality translates to cutting labor costs for the end-user, as well as increasing product longevity.


Hydraulic machine designed by Erwin Tomm
for
use in the 9037-line production.

 

“Our products might cost a little more, but they will last two or three times longer than other products,” Manfred Tomm said. “We offer a wide variety of items — it is a good mix.”

 

In keeping with its commitment to do its share when it comes to protecting the environment, Briarwood uses its own reground plastic and strives to make all of its tools recyclable.

 

“We also have products that are designed to be fitted with bamwood handles,” Manfred Tomm said. “For example, Monahan Partners (of Arcola, IL) uses bamwood handles with our economy Quick-Bite wet mop holder.”

 

The bamwood handles are made from 65 percent bamboo and 35 percent reclaimed hardwood. Bamboo is reported to be stronger than wood, releases 35 percent more oxygen than wood and grows one-third faster. Bamboo is self-generating, which means it doesn’t need to be replanted.

 

On the raw material front, Briarwood’s main raw material is plastic, prices of which have gone up and down with oil prices.

 

“During the past couple of years, plastic prices have increased, but now they have come down slightly. Hopefully that trend will continue,” Manfred Tomm said. “We stick with certain sources where we know the quality is good; therefore, we haven’t had quality issues with

the material.”


(Continued on Top Right Column)

Multi-Tasking Work Force

Key To Success

 

Before founding Briarwood, from 1952-1965 Erwin Tomm served his apprenticeship in mold making, completed 12 years military service obligation, and worked as a journeyman in the mold making trade.

 


Hildegard Tomm reviews accounts receivable.

 

On June 15, 1965, Erwin Tomm began his new venture of operating his own business making custom built molds for different customers. In 1967, he was asked if would be interested in taking over a project involving a mold that was supposed to mold a plastic mop holder.

 

“That mold shop gave up on it,” Erwin Tomm said. “‘This will never work,’ they said.”

 

Erwin Tomm, with little knowledge of the plastic molding process, eagerly took on the project, independent of the original mold shop. He learned that plastic can be used for different products to make the tool work. He found how important is was to design a mold with multiple parts.

 

“The most difficult task was to design the means to grip the mop,” Erwin Tomm said.

 

The mop holder, after some improvement, is still in production today. Moving forward, Erwin Tomm continued to focus on creating additional labor-saving tools.

 

In 1972, Accurate Mold purchased its first molding machine. By 1990, new items were being designed under the name of Briarwood Products. Most items are sold to OEM manufacturers.

 

Today, Briarwood’s success stems from a dedicated, loyal and skillful work force.

 


Vadim Levtonyuk provides customer

service in Briarwood's office.


 

“We owe our success to our hard-working employees, past and present, from the new guy all the way up to my father, the founder,” Manfred Tomm said. “We are always looking for quicker and more efficient ways of doing things — thinking out of the box all around.”

 

Briarwood does not employ a large staff (from 8 to 15 employees depending on rushes and the peak season), which makes the employees’ ability to perform various jobs in the manufacturing process a huge plus.

 

“Our employees work together very efficiently,” Manfred Tomm said. “They have the ability to go from one job to another as the need arises. An item may go through the hands of several employees before it is sold, while other products are produced by teams of employees working side-by-side.

 


Nina Levtonyuk and Galina Leskiv produce

Quick-Bite Mop Heads on a Van Dorn machine.

 

“Many of our people have been with the company more than 15 years. They know their jobs. You don’t have to tell them what to do. They know what to do, and they pay attention to each step in the process to ensure quality.
“Some of our employees have children who worked at Briarwood part-time while in school and later joined the company full time.”

 

More Growth And Expansion

In Briarwood’s Future

 

While the recent recessionary times have taken their toll on the U.S. business landscape, through innovation and expanding its market position, Briarwood has continued to grow and prosper. In looking at his company and the industry it serves, Manfred Tomm is optimistic.

 

“The industry seems to be rebounding and growing,” Manfred Tomm said. “If you are innovative and on top of things, it is a good field to be in, and cost-cutting tools are thriving. We have been increasing our customer base across different markets, so we feel we are in a good position for the future to continue to grow and expand.”

 

Contact: Briarwood Products Company
2900 Bradwell Ave., Cleveland, OH 44109-2795.
Phone: 800-266-1680; Fax: 216-398-1075.
Email: bp@briarwoodproducts.com.
Website: www.briarwoodproducts.com.

 



 

Import, Export Totals A Mixed Bag For First 7 Months

 

import

Including complete list of July 2011

Import/Export Statistics

 

By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

 

U.S. government trade figures for the first seven months of 2011 indicate raw material imports were up in two of the four categories outlined in this issue, compared to the first seven months of 2010. For July 2011, raw material imports were down in three of the four categories outlined, compared to July 2010.


Import totals for the first seven months of 2011 were up in three of the six finished goods categories outlined from the same time period in 2010. In July 2011, four of the six categories outlined recorded decreases, compared to July 2010.

 

RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS


Hog Bristle

The United States imported 34,917 kilograms of hog bristle in July 2011, up 23 percent from 28,279 kilograms imported in July 2010. During the first seven months of 2011, 242,044 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, a 43 percent increase from 169,265 kilograms imported during the first seven months of 2010.

 

China sent all the hog bristle imported by the United States during the first seven months of 2011.

 

The average price per kilogram for July 2011 was $9.09, up 42 percent from the average price per kilogram for July 2010 of $6.39. The average price per kilogram for the first seven months of 2011 was $9.52, up 9 percent from the average price per kilogram of $8.74 for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles during July 2011 was 1.9 million, down 10 percent from 2.1 million for July 2010. During the first seven months of 2011, 13.6 million broom and mop handles were imported, up 16 percent from 11.7 million for the first seven months of 2010.

 

During the first seven months of 2011, the United States received 6 million broom and mop handles from Brazil, 2.9 million from China and 2.7 million from Honduras.

 

The average price per handle for July 2011 was 91 cents, up 28 percent from the average price for July 2010 of 71 cents. The average price for the first seven months of 2011 was 81 cents, up 14 percent from 71 cents for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Brush Backs

July 2011 imports of brush backs totaled 598,181, down 22 percent from the July 2010 total of 771,579 brush backs. During the first seven months of 2011, 3.6 million brush backs were imported, down 28 percent from 5 million for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka shipped 1.7 million brush backs to the United States during the first seven months of 2011, while Canada shipped 1.6 million.

 

The average price per brush back was 53 cents during July 2011, up 10 percent from the average price for July 2010 of 48 cents. For the first seven months of 2011, the average price per brush back was 48 cents, the same as the average price for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles during July 2011 was 3.5 million, down 19 percent from 4.3 million for July 2010. During the first seven months of 2011, 21.4 million metal handles were imported, down 3 percent from 22.1 million for the first seven months of 2010.

 

During the first seven months of 2011, Italy shipped 8.8 million metal handles to the United States, while China sent 7.4 million and Spain shipped 4.3 million.

 

The average price per handle for July 2011 was 69 cents, up 53 percent from 45 cents for July 2010. The average price for the first seven months of 2011 was 69 cents, up 44 percent from 48 cents for the first seven months of 2010.

 

FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS


Brooms Of Broom Corn

Valued At Less Than 96 Cents

Imports of brooms of broom corn valued at less than 96 cents per broom during July 2011 totaled 21,408, up 36 percent from 15,732 brooms imported during July 2010.

 

During the first seven months of 2011, 115,968 brooms of broom corn were imported, up 77 percent from 65,700 imported during the first seven months of 2010.
All the brooms were imported from Mexico.

 

The average price per broom in July 2011 was 82 cents, down 4 percent from 85 cents for July 2010. The average price per broom for the first seven months of 2011 was 80 cents, down 5 percent from 84 cents for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Brooms Of Broom Corn

Valued At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 773,723 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during July 2011, down 5 percent from 814,645 for July 2010. During the first seven months of 2011, 5.1 million brooms of broom corn were imported, down 9 percent from 5.6 million imported during the first seven months of 2010.

 

Mexico shipped 743,111 brooms to the United States during the first seven months of 2011, while Honduras sent the remainder.

 

The average price per broom for July 2011 was $2.32, down 5 cent from the average price for July 2010 of $2.45. The average price per broom for the first seven months of 2011 was $2.40, down 4 percent from $2.44 for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during July 2011 was 182,682, up 26 percent from 145,437 brooms and brushes imported during July 2010. During the first seven months of 2011, 950,450 brooms and brushes were imported, down 44 percent from 1.7 million imported during the first seven months of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka exported 596,313 brooms and brushes to the United States during the first seven months of 2011, while Vietnam sent 166,180 and China shipped 88,229.

 

The average price per unit for July 2011 was $1.36, down 16 percent from $1.61 for July 2010. The average price for the first seven months of 2011 was $1.26, an decrease of 13 percent from the average price recorded for the first seven months of 2010 of $1.45.

 

Toothbrushes

The United States imported 81.5 million toothbrushes in July 2011, down 2 percent from 83 million imported in July 2010. During the first seven months of 2011, 526.9 million toothbrushes were imported, an increase of 2 percent from 518.5 million imported during the first seven months of 2010.

 

(Continued on Top Right Column)

 



China sent 356.2 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first seven months of 2011, while Switzerland shipped 52.9 million.

 

The average price per toothbrush for July 2011 was 26 cents, up 13 percent from 23 cents for July 2010. The average price for the first seven months of 2011 was 23 cents, up 10 percent from the average price of 21 cents for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States imported 9.1 million shaving brushes in July 2011, down 11 percent from 10.2 million imported in July 2010. During the first seven months of 2011, 64.1 million shaving brushes were imported, up slightly from 63.4 million imported during the first seven months of 2010.


China sent 27.5 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first seven months of 2011, while Mexico sent 18.6 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for July 2011 was 9 cents, down 40 percent from 15 cents for July 2010. The average price for the first seven months of 2011 was 12 cents, down 1 cent from the average price for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Paintbrushes

U.S. companies imported 19.3 million paintbrushes during July 2011, down 21 percent from 24.3 million paintbrushes imported during July 2010. Paintbrush imports for the first seven months of 2011 were 134.4 million, down 13 percent from 153.7 million recorded for the first seven months of 2010.

 

China shipped 108 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first seven months of 2011, while Indonesia exported 23 million.

 

The average price per paintbrush for July 2011 was 32 cents, up 14 percent from 28 cents for July 2010. The average price for the first seven months of 2011 was 31 cents, up 19 percent from the average price of 26 cents for the first seven months of 2010.

 

EXPORTS


Export totals for the first seven months of 2011 were up in two of the four categories outlined, compared to the first seven months of 2010. In July 2011, three of the four categories outlined reported decreases in exports, compared to July 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials

The United States exported 9,116 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during July 2011, up 31 percent from the July 2010 total of 6,972 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first seven months of 2011 were 51,749 dozen, down 19 percent from 64,195 dozen for the first seven months of 2010.

 

The United States shipped 20,723 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada during the first seven months of 2011.
The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $42.27 in July 2011, up 4 percent from $40.84 for July 2010.

 

The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first seven months of 2011 was $53.14, an increase of 61 percent from the average price per dozen for the first seven months of 2010 of $33.05.

 

Toothbrushes

During July 2011, the United States exported 6.7 million toothbrushes, down 26 percent from the total recorded in July 2010 of 9.1 million. During the first seven months of 2011, 55.6 million toothbrushes were exported, down 9 percent from 61.1 million exported during the first seven months of 2010.

 

The United States exported 22.5 million toothbrushes to Canada during the first seven months of 2011, while sending 9.8 million toothbrushes to Mexico.

 

The average price per toothbrush for July 2011 was 69 cents, up 5 percent from the average price for July 2010 of 66 cents. The average price per toothbrush for the first seven months of 2011 was 60 cents, down 15 percent from 71 cents for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States exported 2.3 million shaving brushes during July 2011, down 26 percent from 3.1 shaving brushes exported for July 2010. During the first seven months of 2011, 13.7 million shaving brushes were exported, up 32 percent from 10.4 million during the first seven months of 2010.

 

Mexico imported 4.5 million shaving brushes from the United States during the first seven months of 2011. Meanwhile, Canada imported 2.5 million, Brazil received 2.3 million and Colombia imported 1.8 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for July 2011 was 51 cents, the same as the average price for July 2010. The average price for the first seven months of 2011 was 58 cents, down 33 percent from 86 cents recorded for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Paintbrushes

The export total of paintbrushes during July 2011 was 171,839, down 3 percent from 177,264 paintbrush exports recorded for July 2010. During the first seven months of 2011, 1.3 million paintbrushes were exported, up 8 percent from 1.2 million during the first seven months of 2010.

 

Canada imported 971,781 paintbrushes from the United States during the first seven months of 2011.

 

The average price per paintbrush for July 2011 was $8.29, down 21 percent from $10.43 for July 2010. The average price for the first seven months of 2011 was $9.39, down 19 percent from $11.65 recorded for the first seven months of 2010.

 

Click here for entire July 2011 Export/Import Statistics

 

 

deal

 

U.S. Imports 139 Short Tons Of Broom Corn In August

 

By Harrell Kerkhoff, Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

 

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, a total of 139 short tons of broom corn was imported into the United States during August 2011. The value of this import was $392,643, with a cost per ton of $2,825 ($1.41 per pound).

 

All broom corn imported during August arrived from Mexico. The 139 short tons was the highest monthly total thus far in 2011.

 

During the first eight months of 2011, 478 short tons of broom corn entered the United States, with a total value of $1,105,605. The cost per ton of this broom corn was $2,313 ($1.16 per pound). In comparison, after the first eight months of 2010, a total of 663 short tons of broom corn was imported into the United States. Total value of this import was $1,788,571, with a cost per ton of $2,698 ($1.35 per pound).

 

All but 9 of the 478 short tons of broom corn imported into the United States after eight months in 2011 came from Mexico. The remaining broom corn arrived from Chile in February.

 

Bart Pelton, of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, TX, felt the U.S. government’s report regarding broom corn imports for August was accurate.

 

Bart Pelton


According to Pelton, August has traditionally been a strong import month for the crop and it appears this year was no different.

 

“There was some buying going on to take advantage of the summer’s new crop (from the Torreon region of Mexico),” Pelton said. “The new crop was small (in size) and prices were starting to move up (in August). I think some people bought heavy during the month to basically hedge against possible price increases in the coming months due to the small size of the harvest.

 

“August is often the best time to buy broom corn. It’s the time of year when availability is usually at its best; and, being a new crop, color and overall quality is often better. There were no issues with quality from this year’s first crop in Torreon. The weather was fairly decent during the harvest so there were no major issues with staining from rain. The crop was also heavy in hurl, which is what the market wants.”

 

Although the quality of this year’s first Torreon crop was good, the overall crop size was small. Pelton estimated that the crop produced in the neighborhood of 500 short tons on a processed basis. This is much smaller compared to previous years.

 

“The only thing that has saved (the broom corn market) from a big price increase has been the availability of carry-over broom corn grown last year,” Pelton said.

 

He added that the second crop grown in the Torreon region is also expected to be small in acreage. Harvesting for this broom corn began in late September.

 

“Ray LeBlanc (of PelRay International) was in Cadereyta, Mexico, a couple of weeks ago and reported there was very little broom corn available from the late crop,” Pelton said on October 31. “We feel this crop may be around 200 short tons or so in size.”

 

When asked about Mexican broom corn pricing as of the last part of October, Pelton said it continues to “inch up” somewhat — around 5 cents per pound.

 

He noted a lot of exchange rate activity has taken place within the past couple of months between the Mexican peso and the U.S. dollar. This type of activity can influence broom corn pricing. However, Pelton said, many people may view this exchange rate behavior as temporary, thus slowing down broom corn price fluctuation.

 

On the subject of yucca fiber, Pelton said this market remains stable with production staying in line with demand.
Pelton also stated that overall, business at PelRay International continues to improve over similar time periods experienced in 2009 and 2010.

 

(Continued on Top Right Column)

 

 


 

“It seems there is still a slow, but fairly steady, improvement in the economy. I just returned from the ISSA annual convention in Las Vegas, NV. Most of our customers there reported that it was the best show they have had in years. They are also experiencing some strong overall business activity,” Pelton said.

 

Richard Caddy, of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, NC, said August’s cost per pound figure of $1.41 looked accurate to him when considering that the month’s import most likely contained a mix of both hurl and insides. He also felt the 139 short ton import total for the month was a good reflection of what should be expected for August.

 

Richard Caddy


“As a company, we were fairly busy in August, which is traditionally a strong month for broom corn imports, along with September and October,” Caddy said. “August is when a lot of the new crop (from Torreon) becomes available.”

 

When interviewed on November 1, he added that the second Torreon broom corn harvest was well under way. This harvest will likely continue until the first frost in the Torreon region, which usually takes place in November.

 

“Broom corn has been fairly available as of late. It may take an few extra days or a week to accumulate some lengths and grades, but basically it’s been available,” Caddy said.

 

There have been no major quality issues with the first crop Torreon broom corn that Caddy has seen thus far in 2011. He noted that this is true for both No. 1 and No. 2 grades of broom corn.

 

“We often have to take both No. 1 and No. 2 broom corn because there is not enough of the higher grade to go around to fill what we need. This is especially true with 12- through 16-inch hurl,” Caddy said. “Our customers accept this and are happy to use both grades as the quality continues to be good.”

 

Regarding Mexican broom corn pricing as of late October, Caddy said prices have become slightly firmer but remain stable. He noted small increases in pricing can probably be attributed to a slightly smaller than expected Torreon harvest as well as current exchange rate issues between the Mexican peso and U.S. dollar.

 

“These two factors have helped pricing increase slightly, but it’s not been drastic,” Caddy said.

 

Tim Monahan, of The Thomas Monahan Co., in Arcola, IL, was pleased to see 139 short tons of broom corn were sent to the United States during August. He added that the $1.41 per pound mark indicated to him that both insides and hurl were imported.

 

Tim Monahan


Monahan noted that during the latter part of October, Mexican broom corn pricing continued to be fairly stable while broom corn quality from Torreon remained strong.

 

“Color of the broom corn from Torreon remains good while the fiber is fairly fine,” Monahan said. “Meanwhile, the yucca fiber market remains the same. Several (yucca processors) have gone out of business, and the ones who are left are able to produce enough supply to meet demand.”

 

Regarding overall business, Monahan reported that a lot of questions still remain concerning the U.S. economy, “But it seems we keep slowly moving forward.”

 


 

 

 

asasas

 



2011 National Broom & Mop Meeting Scheduled For
November 17-18 In St. Louis

The 2011 National Broom & Mop Meeting is scheduled for November 17-18. Industry manufacturers and suppliers will meet at the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel in St. Louis, MO, (www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/stlsa-renaissance-st-louis-airport-hotel/) located at 9801 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, MO, 63134. This is a different St. Louis location for the meeting than in the recent past. Reservations can be made by phone at 1-800-468-3571.

This year's National Broom & Mop Meeting

is scheduled for November 17-18 in St. Louis.

 



The meeting will allow attendees to discuss curent market trends in the rapidly changing floorcare and related business segments.

 

On Thursday evening (Nov. 17) attendees are invited to a welcome reception hour followed by a round table dinner. Friday morning’s meeting (Nov. 18) will include supplier presentations on the impact of global supply issues. New for this year’s meeting, a panel discussion comprised of industry leaders will replace a keynote speaker. In addition to specific attention directed toward the industry’s challenges for both the short and long term, the panel of manufacturer and supplier representatives will offer insight to questions submitted by attendees. Organizers say the meeting is targeted for conclusion around noon to allow for possible networking lunches.

 

For more information, contact Co-Chair Joel Hastings, Nexstep Commercial Products at 800-252-7666,

or email Joel@ocedarcommercial.com; or Co-Chair Andrew Dailey, Jones Companies, at 877-849-2767,
or email adailey@jonesyarn.com.

 

 

 

 



DuPont Filaments To Demonstrate Company Advances
During InterBrush 2012

 

DuPont Filaments (DuPont) will demonstrate new and refined products for abrasives, cosmetics, toothbrush and paintbrush applications, and a multi-million U.S. dollar investment in new plant capacity, during InterBrush 2012. InterBrush will be held May 9-11 in Freiburg, Germany, and DuPont will be located at Stand 2.1.9.

 

Highlights will include DuPont™ Tynex® A HDP (high durability performance) filaments for enhanced sheet surface cleaning, DuPont™ Natrafil™ textured filaments, Tynex® StaClean™ for high efficiency in antimicrobial toothbrush filaments, and DuPont™ Tynex®, Orel® and Chinex® paintbrush filaments in an extended range of inline dyed colors.

 

The DuPont InterBrush exhibit will project the company’s new corporate theme: “Welcome to the Global Collaboratory,” which, the company says, reflects the global nature of its brush filaments business and its ability to service customers locally in all key regions.

 

“Our filaments business has advanced strongly on several fronts since InterBrush 2008, notably through double-digit growth in fine cosmetic brush filaments, supported by significant capacity expansions at our plants in China to serve customers globally, and several product introductions and enhancements in other important brush markets. This is tailored to the latest market trends and evolving customer needs,” said Hok Hoh Wong, CEO and toothbrush segment leader, DuPont Filaments, based in Shanghai, China.

 

“We offer manufacturing facilities in China, India, The Netherlands and the United States, and marketing, sales and technical support in all the key market regions.”

 

Natrafil® Challenges Natural Hair

In Cosmetic Brushes

 

The DuPont Fine Filaments segment will showcase DuPont™ Natrafil®, a synthetic filament for cosmetic powder brushes which, according to Dupont spokespeople, combines the look and feel of natural hair with equal or better pick up and release performance, but without the imperfections. Natrafil® filaments complement a broad range of Tynex® filaments offering a variation in flexibility, stiffness and softness for face, mascara and nail brushes.


Natrafil® is shown under a microscope.

 

Dupont expects the latest Natrafil® blends to replace specific types of natural hair while retaining their essential characteristics and reflect intensive development work with makeup artists, cosmetic brands, brush manufacturers and cosmetics formulators.  

 

StaClean™ — Highest Efficiency

In Antimicrobial Toothbrush Filaments


DuPont™ Tynex® StaClean™ filaments will headline the company’s offerings to the toothbrush brands at InterBrush 2012. New since the 2008 event, StaClean™ filaments contain antimicrobial additives to inhibit the growth of bacteria.


Toothbrushes feature antimicrobial additives.


According to DuPont, StaClean™ has been shown to exhibit a high level of efficiency in antimicrobial filaments, in addition to being compliant with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European food contact requirements.

 

Efficacy of StaClean™ technology against certain types of bacteria also has been found to meet the technical specifications of industrial associations such as the China Industry Association for Anti-microbial Materials & Products (CIAA).


Global Growth For Tynex®, Orel®

And Chinex® In Premium Paintbrushes


At InterBrush 2012, DuPont says it will demonstrate why it is a significant player in the global paintbrush market with Tynex® and Chinex® nylon, and Orel® polyester tapered filaments for premium paintbrushes, and the company will reveal the latest color capabilities of its inline dyed process.

 

Paintbrush filaments come in an extended

range of inline dyed colors.

 

The range of DuPont paintbrush filaments offers options in shape and taper control, and includes DuPont Solid Round Tapered (SRT), Q and T tapered, and specialty filaments. All offer the consumer and professional painter pick up and less water absorption for smooth, even paint release over time.

 

In 2009 and 2010, the DuPont business funded two market research studies in North America and France in order to understand the buying characteristics of do-it-yourself painters who wanted professional results. The results of the study have been shared with paintbrush manufacturers through industry meetings and trade magazine articles.

 

Dupont spokespeople say findings revealed that these serious painters were willing to pay for a professional quality brush to achieve “time after time” durability, cleanability and performance. The combination of these three attributes can positively affect the useful life of a paintbrush, in some cases extending lifetime to as long as 20 years. The full results of both surveys are available on request from DuPont Filaments.

 

New Tynex® A HDP To Lead

Developments In Abrasive Filaments


DuPont will demonstrate new performance levels in abrasive filaments at InterBrush, with new industrial Tynex® A HDP filaments for sheet steel surface cleaning applications, Tynex® A ceramic filaments to deburr alloy parts and textile fabric sueding, and Tynex®A diamond grit filaments for granite surface “leather finishing.” In addition, the company will reveal development of a new grit-loaded filament for the silicon ingot polishing process used in the photovoltaic industry.

 


Sam Zhong, Abrasive Segment Leader

 

DuPont™ Tynex® A abrasive filaments for industrial and floor care brushes are impregnated with silicon carbide and aluminum oxide abrasive grit particles for fast and easy deburring, cleaning and polishing. The company says they combine chemical resistance, aggressiveness and durability, maintain stiffness when wet, yet are flexible enough to maintain contact with, and ensure proper abrasion of every surface and crevice.

 

 

For more information, please visit:

www.filaments.dupont.com.

 

 



Zahoransky's Z.IAP Provides Anchorless Toothbrush Production

 

According to Zahoransky, Todtnau, Germany, the Z.IAP (Integrated Anchorless Production) is an international success. The fully-automated, high-performance production system enables contact-free production of toothbrushes without metal anchors. The company says this makes the brush both more hygienic for users and recyclable.


Zahoransky's Z.IAP is a fully-automated, high-performance production system.



The performance and quality of Z.IAP has also convinced Team Technologies Inc., based in Morristown, TN (USA). In close cooperation, the system was installed and put into operation within two weeks.

 


Z.IAP produces toothbrushes that

are hygienic and recyclable.

 

“We are very satisfied and were able to produce the first toothbrushes immediately after installation,” Team Technologies Managing Director Steve Henrikson said.

 

For more information, contact Zahoransky at:

info@zahoransky-group.com or visit:

www.zahoransky-group.com.

 

 



PelRay International Honors David McGee With Silver Hall Of Fame Award

 

Mike McKenzie, CEO of PelRay International, recently presented David McGee with an award of excellence in honor of his 25 years of service in the industry. McGee began his career by joining Amex in 1986 as branch manager in Laredo, TX.

 

Shown, left to right, are Mike McKenzie and
David McGee.


After Amex’s Laredo operations were relocated to San Antonio, TX, McGee continued to work in sales and traffic control for Amex, and later joined PelRay International in October 2008.

 

McGee joins COO Ray LeBlanc and CFO Bart Pelton in the “Silver Hall of Fame,” which recognizes employees with 25 years of service.

 

McKenzie noted, “The combination of industry knowledge and employment service by these employees truly contributes to the standard of excellent customer service that PelRay is recognized for.”

 

For more information, contact Ray LeBlanc at: ray@pelray.com.

 



Wooster Launches Little Genius Paintbrush Line

 

Made with a blend of synthetic filaments, new Wooster Little Genius™ brushes provide a smooth, even finish with both water- and oil-based paints. Their soft tips are perfect for taking on hobbies, crafts and other small painting projects. Yet, according to the comapany, they’re designed for more than just painting.


Wooster Little Genius

Little Genius brushes are great for dusting surfaces such as computer keyboards, picture frames, cold air returns, car dashboards and more. The filament blend is also firm enough to clear away thick sawdust from a workbench.

 

The small rounded handles featured on Little Genius brushes are molded by Wooster from recycled plastics. In fact, Wooster says it is reclaiming materials that were once discarded during manufacturing, and incorporating them into products such as the Little Genius. These shorter handles offer added control for reaching into tight spaces and make the brushes portable enough for use all around the home, office or workshop.

 

Little Genius paintbrushes are available in angled 1 1/2- and 2-inch sizes at suggested retail prices of $2.99 and $3.99 USD.

 

For more information, contact Wooster Brush at:

customerservice@woosterbrush.com or visit:

www.woosterbrush.com.

 

 

 



 

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