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Imports/Exports

Imports, Exports Mixed For First Eight Months Of 2017


U.S. government trade figures for the first eight months of 2017 indicated raw material imports were up in two categories outlined: hog bristle and broom and mop handles, compared to the first eight months of 2016. For August 2017, three categories reported decreases: broom and mop handles, brush backs and metal handles, compared to August 2016.


Import totals for the first eight months of 2017 were down in five finished goods categories outlined: brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents, brooms and brushes of

vegetable materials, toothbrushes, shaving brushes and paint rollers, compared to the first

eight months of 2016. In August 2017, five categories outlined recorded increases:

toothbrushes, hairbrushes, paint rollers, paintbrushes and upright brooms, compared
to
August 2016.

 

– RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS –


Hog Bristle
The United States imported 25,425 kilograms of

hog bristle in August 2017, up 48 percent from 17,232 kilograms imported in August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 223,304 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, up 51 percent from 147,963 kilograms imported during the first eight months of 2016.


China sent 216,202 kilograms to the United States during the first eight months of 2017.


The average price per kilogram for August 2017

was $16.70, down 43 percent from the average price per kilogram for August 2016 of $29.17. The average price per kilogram for the first eight months of 2017 was $22.78, down less than 1 percent from the average price per kilogram of $22.84 for the first

eight months of 2016.

 

Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles during August 2017 was 1.7 million, down 6 percent from 1.8 million for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 12.1 million broom and mop handles were imported, up 5 percent from 11.5 million for the first eight months of 2016.


During the first eight months of 2017, the United States received 4.8 million broom and mop handles from Brazil, 4 million from Honduras and 2 million from China.


The average price per handle for August 2017

was 72 cents, down 16 percent from the average

for August 2016 of 86 cents. The average price for the first eight months of 2017 was 80 cents, down

11 percent from 90 cents for the first eight months

of 2016.

 

Brush Backs

August 2017 imports of brush backs totaled 280,895, down 29 percent from 394,317 for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 3.6 million brush backs were imported, down 23 percent from 4.7 million for the first eight months of 2016.


Both Sri Lanka and Canada shipped 1.4 million brush backs to the United States during the first eight months of 2017.


The average price per brush back was 53 cents during August 2017, up 1 cent from August 2016. For the first eight months of 2017, the average price per brush back was 51 cents, up 11 percent from 46 cents for the first eight months of 2016.

 

Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles during August

2017 was 1.6 million, down 27 percent from 2.2 million for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 15.6 million metal handles were imported, down 11 percent from 17.5 million for the first eight months of 2016.


During the first eight months of 2017, China exported 6.6 million metal handles to the United States, while Spain sent 5.1 million and Italy shipped 3.4 million.


The average price per handle for August 2017 was $1.02, up 16 percent from 88 cents for August 2016. The average price for the first eight months of 2017 was 91 cents, down 2 percent from 93 cents for the first eight months of 2016.

 

– FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS –

Brooms Of Broom Corn
Valued At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 641,800 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during August 2017, down 24 percent from 847,076 for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 4.8 million brooms of broom corn were imported, down 8 percent from 5.2 million for the

first eight months of 2016.


Mexico sent nearly all the brooms to the United States during the first eight months of 2017.
The average price per broom for August 2017 was $2.29, down 6 percent from $2.44 for August 2016.

 

The average price per broom for the first eight months of 2017 was $2.38, down 5 percent from

the average price for the first eight months of

2016 of $2.51.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during August 2017 was 221,465, down 46 percent from 413,791 brooms and brushes imported during August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 2 million brooms and brushes were imported, down 23 percent from 2.6 million for the first eight months of 2016.


Sri Lanka exported 1.1 million brooms and brushes
to the United States during the first eight months of 2017, while Vietnam sent 179,662.


The average price per unit for August 2017 was $1.44, up 25 percent from the average price for August 2016 of $1.15. The average price for the first eight months of 2017 was $1.50, up 32 percent from $1.14 for the first eight months of 2016.

Toothbrushes

The United States imported 94 million toothbrushes in August 2017, up 3 percent from 91.2 million imported in August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 725.4 million toothbrushes were imported, down 2 percent from 737.9 million

imported during the first eight months of 2016.


China sent 553.5 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first eight months of 2017.


The average price per toothbrush for August 2017 was 23 cents, the same as for August 2016. The average price for the first eight months of 2017

was 22 cents, the same as for the first eight

months of 2016.

 

Hairbrushes

August 2017 imports of hairbrushes totaled 4.9 million, up 20 percent from 4.1 million for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 33.6 million hairbrushes were imported, up 15 percent from 29.2 million for the first eight months of 2016.


China sent 33.5 million hairbrushes to the United States during the first eight months of 2017.


The average price per hairbrush was 26 cents during August 2017, the same as for August 2016. For the first eight months of 2017, the average price per hairbrush was 25 cents, up 1 cent from the average price for the first eight months of 2016.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States imported 5.1 million shaving brushes in August 2017, down 49 percent from 10 million imported in August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 38.4 million shaving brushes were imported, down 25 percent from 51.5 million imported during the first eight months of 2016.


China sent 28.2 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first eight months of 2017, while South Korea shipped 5.9 million.


The average price per shaving brush for August 2017 was 14 cents, up 100 percent from the average price for August 2016 of 7 cents. The average price for the first eight months of 2017 was also 14 cents, the same as for the first eight months of 2016.

 

Paint Rollers

The import total of paint rollers during August 2017 was 6.8 million, up 48 percent from 4.6 million for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 47.3 million paint rollers were imported, down 4 percent from 49.1 million during the first eight

months of 2016.


China sent 39.1 million paint rollers to the United States during the first eight months of 2017.


The average price per paint roller for August 2017 was 52 cents, up 11 percent from 47 cents for August 2016. The average price for the first eight months of 2017 was 46 cents, down 4 percent from the average price for the first eight months of 2016 of 48 cents.

(Continued in top right column.)

Paintbrushes
U.S. companies imported 23.6 million paintbrushes during August 2017, up 11 percent from 21.3 million for August 2016. Paintbrush imports for the first eight months of 2017 were 177.4 million, up 3 percent from 172.3 million

for the first eight months of 2016.


China shipped 160.1 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first eight months of 2017, while Indonesia sent 10.6 million.


The average price per paintbrush for August

2017 was 30 cents, up 7 percent from 28 cents

for August 2016. The average price for the first eight months of 2017 was also 30 cents, the

same as the average price for the first eight months of 2016.

 

Upright Brooms
The total import of upright brooms for August 2017 was 1.3 million, up 8 percent from 1.2 million for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 11.6 million upright brooms were imported, up 5 percent from 11.1 million imported during the first eight months of 2016.


China sent 10.2 million upright brooms to the United States during the first eight months
of 2017.


The average price per broom for August 2017 was $1.46, down 6 percent from the average price for August 2016 of $1.55. The average price per broom for the first eight months of 2017 was $1.24, down 10 percent from $1.38 for the first eight months of 2016.

– EXPORTS –
Export totals for the first eight months of 2017 were down in three categories outlined: toothbrushes, shaving brushes and paintbrushes, compared to the first eight months of 2016.


In August 2017, three categories reported increases, compared to August 2016: broom and brushes of vegetable materials, artist brushes and paintbrushes.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials
The United States exported 4,153 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during August 2017, up 11 percent from the August 2016 total of 3,734 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first eight months of 2017 were 63,580 dozen, up 45 percent from 43,727 dozen for the first eight months of 2016.


The United States sent 28,472 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada and 12,446 dozen to Mexico, during the first eight months of 2017.


The average price per dozen of brooms and brushes was $60.33 in August 2017, up 16 percent from $51.92 for August 2016. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes

for the first eight months of 2017 was $35.62, down 30 percent from $50.58 for the first eight months of 2016.

 

Toothbrushes
During August 2017, the United States exported 10.1 million toothbrushes, down 18 percent from 12.3 million for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 89.9 million toothbrushes were exported, down 29 percent from 126.6 million exported during the first eight months of 2016.


The United States exported 24.6 million toothbrushes to Canada, 23.2 million to Germany and 13.3 million to Mexico, during the first eight months of 2017.


The average price per toothbrush for August 2017 was 59 cents, up 5 percent from 56 cents for August 2016. The average price per toothbrush for the first eight months of 2017 was 57 cents,

up 27 percent from 45 cents for the first eight months of 2016.

Shaving Brushes
The United States exported 1.1 million shaving brushes during August 2017, the same as for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 11.1 million shaving brushes were exported, down 9 percent from 12.2 million for the first eight months of 2016.


During the first eight months of 2017, the United States exported 6 million shaving brushes to Brazil, 2.4 million to Canada and 1.1 million
to Mexico.


The average price per shaving brush for August 2017 was $1.33, up 12 percent from $1.19 for August 2016. The average price for the first eight months of 2017 was $1.08, down 5 percent from $1.14 for the first eight months of 2016.

 

Artist Brushes
August 2017 exports of artist brushes totaled 918,522, up 25 percent from 733,678 for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 6.5 million artist brushes were exported, up 7 percent from 6.1 million for the first eight months of 2016.


Canada received 4.5 million artist brushes

from the United States during the first eight months of 2017.


The average price per artist brush was $3.72 during August 2017, down 48 percent from the average price for August 2016 of $7.09. For the first eight months of 2017, the average price per artist brush was $3.78, down 6 percent from

$4.04 for the first eight months of 2016.

 

Paintbrushes
The export total of paintbrushes during August 2017 was 316,651, up 32 percent from 240,163 for August 2016. During the first eight months of 2017, 1.6 million paintbrushes were exported, down 27 percent from 2.2 million for the first eight months of 2016.


Canada imported 630,609 paintbrushes from
the United States during the first eight months
of 2017, while the United Kingdom
received 483,336.


The average price per paintbrush for August 2017 was $6.18, down 8 percent from $6.71 for August 2016. The average price for the first eight months of 2017 was $6.58, up 21 percent from $5.42 for the first eight months of 2016.

 

 

August 2017

August 2017 Export Chart

 

Click here for the entire August 2017
Import/Export Statistics.

 

 
 

 

 


 

PART ONE


ABMA News


By Harrell Kerkhoff,
Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine Editor


In the United States alone, 80 to 90 percent of all businesses are family owned, run and/or managed. These companies create 78 percent of new jobs in the country, employ 62 percent of the overall workforce, and make up one-third of today’s Fortune 500 companies.

 

Family businesses also come in all sizes — from such well-known enterprises as Walmart, Nike
and the Ford Motor Company to the neighborhood deli, hardware store and florist. They are considered, by many, the lifeblood of the U.S. economy. Keeping family businesses operating successfully from one generation to the next, however, comes with challenges. Planning is necessary to make sure a family business not only survives the transition to the next generation, but future generations as well. For every success story, there is often one of failure.

 

Addressing this topic during a 2017 ISSA/INTERCLEAN® North America educational session, in
Las Vegas, NV, was Henry Hutcheson, president of Family Business USA, a business consulting
firm. His presentation was titled “Preparing Your Business For The Next Generation,” is highlighted in
this article. His second presentation, titled “Resolving Family Conflict In A Family Business,” will be featured in the November 2017 Broom, Brush and Mop eNewsletter.

 

Hutcheson is a product of a well-known family business himself. His grandparents, Olan Mills Sr. and
Mary Mills, founded Olan Mills Portrait Studios in the 1930s. Hutcheson was once employed in the
family business, along with many other family members. At one time, he added, Olan Mills was
considered one of the largest photography companies in the country, if not the world. After decades
of prosperity, the company was sold in 2011.

 

“We (Olan Mills) went through every issue that a family business could possibly go through over the
years, but we were able to succeed. That is why I’m here today, to show that family businesses can survive from one generation to the next,” he said.

 

Today, Hutcheson focuses on family business succession. His work includes helping family business leaders manage conflict, enhance communication, plan for a smooth transition from one generation
to the next, and successfully assist the next generation to become high performance achievers. He is
also author of the book, “Dirty Little Secrets of Family Business.”


High Performers

On average, family businesses outperform non-family businesses when comparing a number of
financial metrics, according to Hutcheson. Reasons for this include a higher level of personal
investment and loyalty to the company, quicker response times to customer questions and demands, greater continuity during leadership changes, and a higher personal interest and passion for the
business among company leaders, employees and customers.

 

“Large corporations are great. There is nothing wrong with them, but it’s different when you know the people running a business and understand that they are personally involved with a company and truly dedicated to its success,” Hutcheson said. “Also, when you are running a family business, you
understand that some investments are not going to immediately pay off — and that is OK. If you
have to report quarterly to Wall Street, however, long-term investments, which can take time to develop, may cost you your job as CEO. They may not show immediate benefits.”

 

He added that the No. 1 reason family businesses outperform nonfamily businesses is “trust.”

 

“When I first heard that, I thought it was a lot of mumbo jumbo. However, when you think about it,
the trust factor makes sense. Let’s say there are four family members running a company. If they all
trust each other, then everyone is motivated and doing what he/she needs to do. Responsibilities are properly divided. Basically, there are four owners walking around who regularly come together, confer
with each other, and then go his/her own way. If one of the family members doesn’t show up until 9:30 a.m. one day, it’s no big deal, because there is the trust factor in place. The others trust that the
person has a good reason for being late,” Hutcheson said. “On the other hand, if trust is taken away,
you have a big mess.”

 

Hutcheson provided the following findings about the current state of today’s family businesses:

 

Only 33 percent of family businesses will successfully pass into the next generation —
“Two thirds of family businesses fail to go on to the next generation — regardless of the generation
at hand. Many people think it’s often the ‘third generation’ that has the most problems in keeping a business active. The reason they think this is that by the time a company reaches the third generation, there is often more publicity involved if it fails. People are less likely to hear about a business that is
not able to transfer from the first to second generation.”

 

Despite the low 33 percent success rate, Hutcheson added that 86 percent of family members believe their own business will remain family-owned for the next generation.

 

“Who sees the discrepancy? Only 33 percent of family businesses are actually passed on to the next generation, yet 86 percent of family members from such companies believe their own entities will be part of that 33 percent,” he said.

 

■ 45 percent of family business CEOs who plan to retire in five years have thought about succession — “This, of course, means that 55 percent of such CEOs have no succession plans in
place,” according to Hutcheson. He added that 31 percent of family companies overall have no estate/transfer plans.

 

■ 85 percent of family companies have already identified a specific family member as the successor — “The danger here,” Hutcheson added, “is if a company’s continuity plan has long
zeroed in on only one particular offspring, that company is narrowing the talent pool for future leadership.”

 

■ 25 percent of family businesses have a woman as the CEO. “Family businesses are pretty agnostic about who can run the company. I have had clients who are in the construction business with a woman as CEO, leading the way,” Hutcheson said. “These CEOs have done great because they were properly trained and are dedicated.”

 

■ 60 percent of CEOs plan to die in office — “I have always contended that there has to be a better plan,” Hutcheson said.

 

He added that family businesses are made of three basic elements — the family, the business and the ownership. These three areas often overlap. Any significant change involving one of these three elements often impacts the other two elements. This can include a birth, death, marriage, divorce, retirement, etc.

 

“All of these things can have a cascading effect throughout the entire family business system,”
Hutcheson said.


What The Next Generation Wants, Needs

Passing the baton to the next generation of family business ownership should come with specific guidance, guidelines and assurances. Hutcheson highlighted several key areas that company leaders would do well to focus on to make sure any transition is successful. They are:

 

■ Independence — For members of the next generation to be successful, they must have some
sense of independence, according to Hutcheson. One of the best ways to build independence is to have family members — those who may take over the company some day — to first seek work elsewhere.
This will help the future leaders find out what it’s like to live in another location and better discover their specific strengths and weaknesses.

 

“After a period of time, such as two years, if these people are still interested in joining the family business, then they should be more prepared to one day lead the company,” Hutcheson said.

 

Greater independence can also be gained when giving the next generation of family business members specific projects to accomplish at work, and then having them succeed or fail on their own.

 

“If you have a child learning how to ride a bicycle, sooner or later you have to take off the training wheels. That child may fall a few times, but pretty soon he/she learns how to ride,” Hutcheson said. “The same is true when learning how to run a company.”

 

■ Competency — “Obviously, you have to be reasonably good at something in the family business
if you want to lead it in the future,” Hutcheson said. “If a person doesn’t have a knack for what the company is doing, it’s probably not going to work out. This doesn’t mean the person isn’t bright.
I have met a number of extremely bright people who just didn’t do well in a particular business.”

 

■ Communication — Does a person in line to run a company know the right situation to write an email versus a text versus a memo versus holding an actual meeting? Can that person properly communicate within the organization? Does he/she know how to listen?

“Some people do not have very good communication skills. The good news is, a lot of these skills can be developed,” Hutcheson said. “A person doesn’t have to be a great orator, but he/she must have a sufficient ability to communicate with fellow family members, employees and customers to be effective.”

 

■ Define responsibilities and expectations: Who is going to do what? — Hutcheson said it’s important to properly define each job, and hold both family and non-family members accountable.

 

“Does the business have true organization in place, or is it helter-skelter?” Hutcheson asked.

 

■ Understanding finances — A person in charge of a company must understand how that company makes money, as well as its costs. “Can a person read an income statement? Does he/she know what a balance sheet is, and is willing to look at these numbers on a regular basis?” Hutcheson said.

 

■ The ability to develop strategy — When leading a company, Hutcheson said, it’s important to be able to look 3, 5 and/or 10 years ahead. This helps in determining possible changes in technology, customer demands, etc.

 

“Sometimes, the leader is able to determine that his/her company’s core business must change in the future and head into a new direction,” he said.

 

■ Estate planning — After the next generation is firmly in place at the family business, a conversation should take place as to what happens when members of the previous generation decide it’s time to leave.


“It’s really hard for some company leaders to leave the business. Often, they have spent their
entire working lives at the company, have figured it all out, and are really good at what they do.
Many ask themselves, ‘If I retire, what will I do with all of my time?’” Hutcheson said.
“The good news is, there are options.”

 

Hutcheson explained that many owners/leaders of family companies take on one of five main “roles”
once they leave. Some of these roles are better than others.

 

There is what Hutcheson describes as the “monarch” role. This is when the owner keeps telling the next generation, “One of these days, this company will be all yours,” but then he/she never seems to leave.


“One day, the owner dies, at which point members of the next generation are nearing retirement themselves,” Hutcheson said.

 

The second role sometimes taken is that of a “general.” This is a company leader who “retires,” but often comes back to the business to put out “fires.” The trouble is, after bouncing between retirement and coming back to the company for a number of years, members of the next generation — as well as employees — do not know who is truly in charge.

 

“The next generation eventually realizes, ‘We can’t do anything, because Mom/Dad is just going to come back and change whatever we have done,’” Hutcheson said.

 

The third role, which Hutcheson said is often the best, is that of an “ambassador.”

“The former company leader keeps a corner office and really doesn’t leave. However, he/she lets somebody else lead the company on a day-to-day basis, and instead focuses on key customers or other parts of the business.

 

“The former leader remains the ‘big cheese in the room,’ but lets the next generation handle all of the details,” Hutcheson said.

 

Then there is the “governor,” which is when a company leader announces that after a certain period
of time, he/she is leaving the company for good. In the meantime, the leader reviews the best
candidates to take over, and then grooms the one he/she deems to be best suited to lead the family business in the future.

 

“My favorite role, that is sometimes used, is that of the ‘inventor,’” Hutcheson said. “Many people
get involved with a business because they have a particular knack or skill. They really don’t want to do
all of the other stuff, such as manage people or conduct all of the administrative duties. They just want
to focus on that particular area of the business.

 

“I have had a number of clients in a situation where the mom/dad is now working for the son/daughter.
The former leader is doing his/her favorite thing within the company and, essentially, has become an employee of the business he/she once ran.”

 

Hutcheson also addressed how to best get new generation members involved in a family business.
The main focus should be seeking out their true interests, and not applying pressure.

 

“At first, you are just trying to see if a person has a knack for what your company does? Is he/she interested? Focus on giving that person a summer job at the company, and let him/her have fun with
that job. There should be no pressure,” he said. “When the person finishes college and is on his/her
own for awhile, then see if he/she is serious about returning to the family business. If so, and you feel
the person will do a good job, then it’s time to start putting some plans in place.”

 

Hutcheson also discussed what he termed “family business disrupters,” from data that has been
gathered over the years. These are areas of concern that can place additional stress in the transition process between one generation of leadership or leaders and the next. The top three disrupters are: mental/mood disorders, addictions and relationships/conflicts.

 

“It’s not hard to understand how (the category) relationships/conflicts can be viewed as a major
family business disrupter, but it’s surprising to many that addiction and mental/mood disorders are so
high on the list,” Hutcheson said. “These are the biggest contributors to family business issues.
I see it a lot.

 

“Everyone loves his/her children, wants to see them succeed and knows there are often great opportunities for those running a successful family business. However, you can’t ignore the possibility
that a member of the next generation, a person who might lead the company some day, has a serious addiction or mental/mood disorder. It must be acknowledged beforehand, and not swept under the rug.”


The Value Of Sound Governance

Developing a family mission statement becomes essential when operating a multi-generational family business. As Hutcheson explained, the next generation needs to know, “Exactly why are we in business, and what do we stand for?”

 

“Employees and customers should also know the answers to these questions,” he said. “Many employees love to work for, and customers love to do business with, family-owned companies.

 

“Establishing sound governance is important. You have all heard the saying, ‘Good fences make good neighbors.’ As a family business, it’s important to put up ‘some good fences.’ They come in the form of sound policies and procedures.”

 

Hutcheson is a big believer, as well, in family business meetings. This is when family members regularly meet and discuss different topics associated with running their company.

 

He also recommends that family businesses have a succession plan — one that is actually written down — and to form an independent advisory board.

 

“This type of board involves people who are not part of the company or family. It helps to have such people in place who you can share information and discuss how things are going with the company. These board members can provide helpful external input,” Hutcheson said. “I would also recommend developing a family employment policy. In it, describe who from the family gets to work at the company. Does everybody qualify? What are the qualifications? How are family members at the company to be measured and evaluated? Who is going to do the measuring and evaluations? Who determines how much a family member gets paid, and when to promote that person?

 

“It’s important to have these types of conversations. Get it all down on paper, so everybody knows what to expect before they join the business.”

 

Hutcheson also addressed his top four objectives to succession planning. They are:

 

■ Treat everyone fairly — “Remember, fair is not always equal. I’m not saying, however, it doesn’t need to be equal,” Hutcheson said.

 

■ Value non-family employees — “These are the people who got your company to where it is now,
and they are the ones who are going to take it into the future,” he added. “When you start thinking
about transition and succession, it’s also important to have these conversations with your employees.
You don’t have to accommodate all of their wants and needs, but the biggest want and need they
often have is to simply be updated as to what is going on, and to know the role they play in the
transition and succession process. This is especially true for key employees, those who have been
around for a long time.”

 

■ Family cohesion is a must — When working on a family business transition, Hutcheson said that
"hurt feelings" should be avoided. Preserving both a healthy business and a healthy family needs to
be the main objective.

 

■ Have a good estate plan in place, in a financially-wise manner.

 

Visit www.familybusinessusa.com for more information.


 



Annual National Broom, Mop & Brush Meeting

Scheduled For Nov. 16-17 In St. Louis

 

Renaissance Hotel

The annual National Broom, Mop & Brush Meeting is scheduled for November 16-17, 2017,

in St. Louis, MO. The event will again take place at the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel.


Co-chairpersons Jan Haviland, of Haviland Corporation, Linn, MO, and Tim Morgan, of Vonco Products, Trevor, WI, have been working to ensure all manufacturers, suppliers and trade press representing different broom, mop, brush and related industries are invited.


The event begins on Thursday, November 16, with registration from 4 to 6 p.m., a networking hour

from 5 to 6 p.m., and dinner starting at 6 p.m.


The main program will take place on Friday, November 17, beginning with a breakfast buffet at

7:30 a.m. The meeting portion of the event begins around 8:20 a.m. with opening remarks. This will

be followed by guest speaker Dr. Sean Siebert, who will discuss, “A New Way of Looking at Business.”

Dr. Siebert, who specializes as a community innovation consultant, will focus on how entrepreneurship should be viewed as a mindset, not an occupation.


“Our guest speaker will help this year’s attendees to think more ‘innovatively,’ in an effort to assist their individual companies to become even better during today’s changing times,” Haviland said. “Through the activities planned for this entire annual meeting, a goal has been set to get attendees revved up and moving forward for the benefit of their individual businesses and overall lives.”


There will also be reports presented by industry professionals, focusing on such topics as broom corn, tampico and palmyra fibers; synthetic filaments; wood, metal and fiberglass handles; mop yarn; wire; packaging; and a foreign exchange update.


The cost of the meeting is $150 per person, while the room rate at the Renaissance St. Louis Airport

Hotel is $119 per night for reservations made by Oct. 25, 2017. Hotel reservations can be made by

phone at 1-314-429-1100. Attendees making hotel reservations at the Renaissance are asked to mention that they will be attending the National Broom, Mop & Brush Meeting. The Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel is located at 9804 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, MO 63134.


For more information, contact co-chairs:
Jan Haviland at jhaviland@havilandcorp.com
or Tim Morgan at tim@vonco.com.

 




Industry Calendar of Events