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By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

 

Vonco Products

 

Despite the sluggish U.S. economy and uncertainty about how things are playing out in Washington, D.C., on the political front, two packaging company executives told Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine recently that their businesses have recorded slow, steady growth.

 

Since 1955, the family owned Vonco Products, Inc., of Lake Villa, IL, a northern suburb of Chicago, has been a leading manufacturer of custom flexible packaging, specialty and promotional products in the global marketplace.

 

The company, which takes pride in its many innovative products, offers custom packaging for a wide range of markets, including the broom, brush and mop industry; medical; industrial and retail packaging.

 

Because of Vonco’s diversity, versatility and high quality products, the company has been able to grow and remain highly competitive during the past several years in a down economy.

 

Les Laske, of Vonco Products


“The economy is still sluggish and business has been up and down across various market segments,” said Vonco Vice President of Sales Les Laske. “While Vonco is gaining business in the various marketplaces, the economy is still causing problems for some of our clients.”

 

In January 2008, Vonco purchased another Chicagoland packaging business, Poly Shapes, of Gilbert, IL, which proved to be a major plus when the worst of the recession hit in the late summer and fall of that year.

 

Integrating the best of Poly Shapes with Vonco made Vonco an even more efficient company. This heightened efficiency improved Vonco’s ability to offset the rise in material costs associated with the recession. Laske reported that raw material costs have not been as volatile during the past year.

 

“However, lead times to receive raw materials have been extended,” he said.

 

The need for shorter lead times has come into play for various reasons in recent years when it comes to filling orders, including the trend for companies to maintain low inventories as a cost cutting measure — another result of the down economy.

 

“What happens is we get that opportunity call and we have to produce packaging fast enough, as people are keeping inventories tight,” Laske said.


He also spoke of another scenario in which short lead times are a factor.

 

“Sometimes, as some clients’ are experiencing growth again following the recession, they pick up orders and we have to react to short lead times,” Laske said. “This is always a challenge, as well as an opportunity for Vonco.”

 

Vonco’s emphasis on efficiency has also enabled it to receive orders from companies that have been doing business overseas seeking to come back onshore.

 

“We have regained various opportunities from people who have done some business in China,” Laske said. “There are concerns in the packaging industry with compliance with various regulations for packaging when bringing in products from overseas. It is more difficult to certify that the regulations are being met when it comes to foreign packaging.”

 

For the retail market, Vonco offers self-locking broom sleeves, mop bags, handle bags, printed packaging materials, Christmas stockings, hand puppets and food packaging, among other products.

 

For the medical field, Vonco offers drainage and specimen bags, bottle holders, disposable gloves and boots, instrument covers, and more. Its industrial products include liquid dispensers, round bottom bags, volume indicators, multi-compartment bags, filter bags, boiling bags, and others.

 

One of Vonco’s most well known products by the general public is its ThunderStix® noisemaker. The colorful noisemakers have become a favorite of fans at sporting events around the globe. There is even a pair on display in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY, and they could be seen during this year’s Major League Baseball playoffs.


(Continued on Top Right Column)

“We have added various products to our promotional lineup to complement our ThunderStix noisemakers, such as Spirit Hair,” Laske said. “Our entire promotional line can be seen at www.thunderstix.com.”

 

Laske also reported the company has launched the new www.vonco.com, and www.thunderstix.com will be upgraded in 2012.

 

Laske’s grandfather, Walter VonStoeser, founded the company in his garage in 1955. Laske’s father, Larry Laske, who is now the president of Vonco, joined VonStoeser in 1959, helping him move out of his garage and into the company’s first stand-alone facility.

 

In 1977, Larry Laske introduced the company’s patented fast load, self-locking custom poly broom sleeves into the marketplace.

 

Another important part of Vonco’s success has been its ability to accomplish high quality process printing to satisfy customers’ requests for complicated printing jobs. Vonco offers sophisticated six- and eight-color printing capability.

 

These state-of-the art printing presses were added when Vonco expanded its facility in 2003, and the eight-color printing side of the business has been expanding each year.

 

Furthermore, Vonco’s printing operation is supported by its art department, which works with customers to ensure the finished product is of the highest quality, as process printing continues to gain in popularity. Process printing results in artwork that looks like a photograph, as opposed to traditional line art.

 

Vonco also designs and manufactures its own fabrication machinery and tooling to produce custom projects.
As the economy struggles to recover, Laske outlined his vision of what the company must do moving forward to continue to be successful and prosperous.

 

“We just have to continue to adapt and keep our company modern,” he said. “We must continue to be on top of what regulations are out there at any given time and make sure we remain in compliance. We are doing more business in the food packaging market, which has a different set of standards than the packaging side of our business, and we are compliant with those regulations, as well.”

 

Contact: Vonco Products, Inc.,

201 Park Ave., Lake Villa, IL 60046.

Phone: 847-356-2323;

Fax: 847-356-8630.
Websites: www.vonco.com.
www.thunderstix.com.

Email: sales@vonco.com.

 

______________________________________

 

Creative Poly

 

 

Founded in 1992, Creative Poly, Inc., of Rochelle, IL, located in Chicagoland, has been a leading manufacturer of printed and specialty poly bags, including broom sleeves and mop bags. Creative Poly serves customers in both the United States and Mexico.

 

“As the economy improves, bringing additional sales and growth, Creative Poly, Inc. continues to invest in equipment,” according to owner and President Walt Dudziak. “We are adding an additional bag line, purchased in December 2011, that we anticipate will be in operation in March 2012 to match up with an additional reclosable zipper line that we put into service in December 2011. We are also accepting bids on a new complete bag line, anticipated to be purchased in the second half of 2012.”

 

Creative Poly, Inc. continues to manufacture custom made products with short lead times and exceptional quality. Growth and profitability have been slow and steady, but they have also been solid, according to Dudziak.



Walt Dudziak, of Creative Poly


“The sales outlook continues to be extremely optimistic for continued growth,” Dudziak said. “Creative Poly is looking forward to another successful year.”


 

Contact: Creative Poly, Inc., 620 W. Lincoln Ave., Rochelle, IL 61068. Phone: 815-562-9002;

Fax: 815-562-8551.
Website: www.creativepoly.com.
Email: sales@creativepoly.com.

 



 

Import Totals Mostly Down Through 3rd Quarter; Exports Mixed Bag

 

import

Including complete list of August

Import/Export Statistics

 

By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

 

U.S. government trade figures for the first nine months of 2011 indicate raw material imports were up in two of the four categories outlined in this issue, compared to the first nine months of 2010. For September 2011, raw material imports were also up in two of the four categories outlined, compared to September 2010.

 

Import totals for the first nine months of 2011 were down in five of the eight finished goods categories outlined from the same time period in 2010. In September 2011, six of the eight categories outlined recorded decreases, compared to September 2010.

 

RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS


Hog Bristle

The United States imported 40,377 kilograms of hog bristle in September 2011, up 144 percent from 16,581 kilograms imported in September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 322,361 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, a 27 percent increase from 254,246 kilograms imported during the first nine months of 2010.

 

China sent 322,215 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first nine months of 2011.

 

The average price per kilogram for September 2011 was $7.97, down 58 percent from the average price per kilogram for September 2010 of $19.04. The average price per kilogram for the first nine months of 2011 was $9.53, up 18 percent from the average price per kilogram of $8.06 for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles during September 2011 was 1.8 million, down 18 percent from 2.2 million for September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 17.6 million broom and mop handles were imported, up 11 percent from 15.8 million for the first nine months of 2010.

 

During the first nine months of 2011, the United States received 7.7 million broom and mop handles from Brazil, 3.7 million from China and 3.6 million from Honduras.

 

The average price per handle for September 2011 was 91 cents, up 8 percent from the average price for September 2010 of 84 cents. The average price for the first nine months of 2011 was 82 cents, up 11 percent from 74 cents for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Brush Backs

September 2011 imports of brush backs totaled 591,358, up 87 percent from the September 2010 total of 316,890 brush backs. During the first nine months of 2011, 4.6 million brush backs were imported, down 21 percent from 5.8 million for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka shipped 2.2 million brush backs to the United States during the first nine months of 2011, while Canada shipped 2.1 million.

 

The average price per brush back was 50 cents during September 2011, down 18 percent from the average price for September 2010 of 61 cents. For the first nine months of 2011, the average price per brush back was 48 cents, down 1 cent from the average price for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles during September 2011 was 1.7 million, down 19 percent from 2.1 million for September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 25.4 million metal handles were imported, down 11 percent from 28.7 million for the first nine months of 2010.

 

During the first nine months of 2011, Italy shipped 10.2 million metal handles to the United States, while China sent 10 million and Spain shipped 4.3 million.

 

The average price per handle for September 2011 was 84 cents, up 31 percent from 64 cents for September 2010. The average price for the first nine months of 2011 was 71 cents, up 39 percent from 51 cents for the the first nine months of 2010.


 

FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS


Brooms Of Broom Corn

Valued At Less Than 96 Cents

Imports of brooms of broom corn valued at less than 96 cents per broom during September 2011 totaled 23,136, up 119 percent from 10,560 brooms imported during September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 154,884 brooms of broom corn were imported, up 67 percent from 92,652 imported during the first nine months of 2010.

 

All the brooms were imported from Mexico.

 

The average price per broom in September 2011 was 82 cents, up 6 percent from 77 cents for September 2010. The average price per broom for the first nine months of 2011 was 81 cents, down 2 cents from the average price for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Brooms Of Broom Corn

Valued At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 692,835 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during September 2011, up 8 percent from 639,801 for September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 6.6 million brooms of broom corn were imported, down 6 percent from 7 million imported during the first nine months of 2010.

 

Mexico shipped 6.4 million brooms to the United States during the first nine months of 2011, while Honduras sent the remainder.

 

The average price per broom for September 2011 was $2.41, down 7 percent from the average price for September 2010 of $2.60. The average price per broom for the first nine months of 2011 was $2.40, down 2 percent from $2.45 for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during September 2011 was 119,902, down 16 percent from 142,886 brooms and brushes imported during September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 1.3 million brooms and brushes were imported, down 38 percent from 2.1 million imported during the first nine months of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka exported 788,153 brooms and brushes to the United States during the first nine months of 2011, while Vietnam sent 200,440 and China shipped 126,167.

 

The average price per unit for September 2011 was $1.25, down 7 percent from $1.35 for September 2010. The average price for the first nine months of 2011 was $1.23, an decrease of 17 percent from the average price recorded for the first nine months of 2010 of $1.48.

 

Toothbrushes

The United States imported 73.3 million toothbrushes in September 2011, down 5 percent from 77.4 million imported in September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 676.2 million toothbrushes were imported, an decrease of 2 percent from 690.8 million imported during the first nine months of 2010.

 

China sent 467.7 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first nine months of 2011. Also shipping toothbrushes to the United States were Switzerland, 60.9 million; Vietnam, 48.6 million; India, 31.3 million; and Germany, 22.5 million.

 

The average price per toothbrush for September 2011 was 24 cents, up 20 percent from the average price for September 2010 of 20 cents. The average price for the first nine months of 2011 was 23 cents, up 2 cents from the average price for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Hairbrushes

September 2011 imports of hairbrushes totaled 4.8 million, down 8 percent from the September 2010 total of 5.2 million hairbrushes. During the first nine months of 2011, 36.8 million hairbrushes were imported, up 6 percent from 34.7 million for the first nine months of 2010.

 

China shipped 36.1 million hairbrushes to the United States during the first nine months of 2011.


 

(Continued on Top Right Column)



The average price per hairbrush was 28 cents during September 2011, the same as the average price for September 2010. For the first nine months of 2011, the average price per hairbrush was also 28 cents, the same as the average price for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States imported 9.7 million shaving brushes in September 2011, down 17 percent from 11.7 million imported in September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 86.5 million shaving brushes were imported, up 1 percent from 85.6 million imported during the first nine months of 2010.

 

China sent 39.9 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first nine months of 2011, while Mexico sent 25.1 million, South Korea shipped 10.6 million and Germany exported 8.8 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for September 2011 was 11 cents, down 1 cent from the average price for September 2010. The average price for the first nine months of 2011 was also 11 cents, down 2 cents from the average price for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Paint Rollers

The import total of paint rollers during September 2011 was 4.3 million, down 4 percent from 4.5 million recorded for September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 47.6 million paint rollers were imported, down 1 percent from 48 million during the first nine months of 2010.

 

China sent 34.7 million paint rollers to the United States during the first nine months of 2011, while Mexico exported 9.8 million and Germany shipped 2.8 million.

 

The average price per paint roller for September 2011 was 48 cents, up 9 percent from 44 cents for September 2010. The average price for the first nine months of 2011 was 43 cents, up 1 cent from the average price recorded for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Paintbrushes

U.S. companies imported 17.5 million paintbrushes during September 2011, down 13 percent from 20 million paintbrushes imported during September 2010. Paintbrush imports for the first nine months of 2011 were 173.3 million, down 13 percent from 198.8 million recorded for the first nine months of 2010.

 

China shipped 139.4 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first nine months of 2011, while Indonesia exported 29.3 million.

 

The average price per paintbrush for September 2011 was 33 cents, up 32 percent from the average price for September 2010 of 25 cents. The average price for the first nine months of 2011 was 31 cents, up 15 percent from the average price of 27 cents for the first nine months of 2010.

 

EXPORTS

 

Export totals for the first nine months of 2011 were up in three of the five categories outlined, compared to the first nine months of 2010. In September 2011, three of the five categories outlined reported decreases in exports, compared to September 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials

The United States exported 9,665 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during September 2011, up 54 percent from the September 2010 total of 6,268 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first nine months of 2011 were 65,628 dozen, down 16 percent from 77,819 dozen for the first nine months of 2010.

 

The United States sent 25,480 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada during the first nine months of 2011 and 13,216 dozen to The United Kingdom.

 

The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $39.50 in September 2011, up 33 percent from $29.60 for September 2010. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first nine months of 2011 was $51.84, an increase of 52 percent from the average price per dozen for the first nine months of 2010 of $34.14.

 

Toothbrushes

During September 2011, the United States exported 9.4 million toothbrushes, down 40 percent from the total recorded in September 2010 of 15.7 million. During the first nine months of 2011, 73.8 million toothbrushes were exported, down 14 percent from 85.7 million exported during the first nine months of 2010.

 

The United States exported 30.5 million toothbrushes to Canada during the first nine months of 2011, while sending 12.5 million toothbrushes to Mexico.

 

The average price per toothbrush for September 2011 was 63 cents, up 24 percent from the average price for September 2010 of 51 cents. The average price per toothbrush for the first nine months of 2011 was 61 cents, down 9 percent from 67 cents for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States exported 2 million shaving brushes during September 2011, down 13 percent from 2.3 million shaving brushes exported for September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 17.4 million shaving brushes were exported, up 12 percent from 15.6 million during the first nine months of 2010.

 

Mexico imported 4.8 million shaving brushes from the United States during the first nine months of 2011, while Brazil imported 4.1 million, and Canada received 3.6 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for September 2011 was 62 cents, up 1 cent from the average price for September 2010. The average price for the first nine months of 2011 was 60 cents, down 22 percent from 77 cents recorded for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Artist brushes

September 2011 exports of artist brushes totaled 710,917, down 9 percent from the September 2010 total of 778,552 artist brushes. During the first nine months of 2011, 8.5 million artist brushes were exported, up 52 percent from 5.8 million for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Canada received 4.1 million artist brushes from the United States during the first nine months of 2011, while Brazil imported 1.3 million.

 

The average price per artist brush was $3.05 during September 2011, down 4 percent from the average price for September 2010 of $3.19. For the first nine months of 2011, the average price per artist brush was $2.53, down 19 percent from the average price for the first nine months of 2010 of $3.11.

 

Paintbrushes

The export total of paintbrushes during September 2011 was 214,546, up 22 percent from 176,231 for September 2010. During the first nine months of 2011, 1.8 million paintbrushes were exported, up 13 percent from 1.6 million during the first nine months of 2010.

 

Canada imported 1.3 million paintbrushes from the United States during the first nine months of 2011.
The average price per paintbrush for September 2011 was $10.65, down 6 percent from $11.38 for September 2010.

 

The average price for the first nine months of 2011 was $9.12, down 20 percent from $11.46 recorded for the first nine months of 2010.

 

Click here for entire September Export/Import Statistics

 

 

deal

 

U.S. Imports 48 Short Tons Of Broom Corn In October

 

By Harrell Kerkhoff, Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

 

 

 

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, 48 short tons of broom corn were imported into the United States during October 2011. The value of this import was $105,755, with a cost per ton of $2,203 ($1.10 per pound).

 

All broom corn imported during October arrived from Mexico. The 48 short tons was considerably lower compared to one year prior, when 123 short tons of broom corn were imported during October 2010.

 

For the first 10 months of 2011, 613 short tons of broom corn had entered the United States, with a total value of $1,441,180. The cost per ton of this broom corn was $2,351 ($1.18 per pound). In comparison, after the first 10 months of 2010, a total of 839 short tons of broom corn was imported into the United States. Total value of this import was $2,242,418, with a cost per ton of $2,673 ($1.34 per pound).

 

All but 9 of the 613 short tons of broom corn imported into the United States after 10 months in 2011 came from Mexico. The remaining broom corn arrived from Chile in February.

 

Bart Pelton, of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, TX, said October’s imported mark of 48 short tons is near the average amount of material currently being used on a monthly basis in the United States.

 

“I think U.S. consumption is around 50 to 75 short tons a month right now. Also, some of the (U.S. broom) shops stocked up earlier on broom corn when the new (Torreon) crop first arrived. Therefore, there wasn’t as much buying taking place in October,” Pelton said.

 

He added that October’s average price of $1.10 per pound looks low. However, this could be the result of more raw/unprocessed broom corn being imported during the month, bringing down the average import price. He noted that many craft broom makers desire raw broom corn.

 

“Percentage wise, more raw imported broom corn is being brought into the United States right now compared to the past few years,” Pelton said.

 

It was also noted by Pelton that the second Torreon broom corn harvest last year was almost nonexistent — at around or under 100 short tons. This was due to several factors.

 

“Part of it was low broom corn prices as well as drought conditions. There is not only an exceptional drought still taking place in Texas and New Mexico, but also south of the Rio Grande River. This has resulted in limited moisture and low lake levels. There is not as much irrigation water available,” Pelton said.

 

He added that parts of northern Mexico have received moisture this winter, but drought conditions still persist. Higher prices from competing crops grown in Mexico have also resulted in fewer broom corn fields being found in the country.

 

On last factor that has negatively influenced Mexican broom corn production is the ongoing problem with drug cartel-related violence in the northern part of the country.

 

Pelton said the threat of violence prevented many broom corn buyers from visiting the Torreon area in 2011. These are the same people who help promote the production of broom corn.

 

“All of these conditions together have helped decline the supply of Mexican broom corn. As a result, we are seeing prices become firmer in Mexico despite the peso being weak,” Pelton said.

 

At the moment, he added, U.S. demand for the crop has been aided by carry-over material. Since overall demand for broom corn has decreased, both in Mexico and the United States, this carry-over has kept prices from getting out of control.

Bart Pelton


“We will have to wait and see if (the carry-over) is going to be enough to help get us by until the next Torreon harvest (in late spring/early summer of 2012),” Pelton said. “There might be a little broom corn coming from Apatzingan (in Mexico) in late February or March, but I don’t think it will be much. It might produce 20 to 50 tons, which is pretty insignificant.”

 

Pelton reported no major issues with the quality level of the broom corn currently being imported into the United States.


(Continued on Top Right Column)

“We recently brought in some raw broom corn from the new crop and it’s pretty nice. There can always be improvements made to the processing, but the raw corn itself is pretty good right now,” he said.

 

Pelton also reported on the status of yucca fiber. He said prices have increased slightly, but the overall market for this material remains remarkably stable.

 

Regarding the state of overall business at his company, Pelton said he saw improved activity taking place during last December and the first part of this January, compared to the similar time period one year prior.

 

“Business has improved from last year, and last year was an improvement compared to the previous year,” Pelton said.

 

Richard Caddy, of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, NC, was not surprised to see that only 613 short tons of broom corn was imported into the United States after the first 10 months of 2011. He did feel, however, that October’s import total value, which translates to $1.10 per pound, was too low to be accurate.

Richard Caddy

 

“Current prices are really 30 to 50 percent higher,” he said. “As for the yearly total after 10 months, (613 short tons) reflects where the market has been. I don’t think the final (2011) import total will surpass the 2010 mark (of 1,017 short tons).”

 

Caddy added that there remains enough broom corn within the marketplace — as of the first part of 2012 — to meet current U.S. and Mexican demand from broom makers. However, this could change by the upcoming spring or early summer.

 

“We may be looking at some shortages in supply as we get closer to the next major Mexican harvest this summer. It’s not good that the 2011 broom corn harvests in Mexico were smaller than normal. This could cause problems down the road. It’s hard to say,” Caddy said. “If (broom corn) demand continues to drop, then (supply and demand) will remain in balance. However, I have seen some fairly good (broom corn) sales as of late. We will just have to see what the level of demand is by April and May.”

 

When interviewed on January 11, he added that Mexican broom corn pricing had increased slightly.

 

“Nobody likes to pay more, but higher prices may help encourage farmers in Mexico to grow more broom corn,” he said. “Last year’s two Torreon crops (in Mexico) were smaller than what was grown in past years. The second crop, in particular, was real small. In comparison, there was a big enough second crop in 2010 to provide some decent carry-over material.”

 

Although the amount of broom corn harvested in Mexico during 2011 was light, it appears the quality of last year’s crops did not suffer.

 

“Thankfully, quality has remained high. There are fewer ‘shorts’ than in the past, the color is pretty good and the tips are nice. The processing quality has been good as well. I also see no negative issues with the raw broom corn being used by those who make handmade brooms,” Caddy said.

 

He did report difficulties in receiving shorter types of broom corn, such as 12- and 14-inch hurl.

 

“I have had to fill in with the No. 2 grade by necessity for these sizes. On the positive side, the No. 2 grade has still been very nice broom corn. It might not have the same color as No. 1, but it’s been processed correctly and still provides good value,” Caddy said. “The green color can define No. 1 broom corn, but what I really look for as a buyer, along with many of my accounts, is processing and fiber quality.

 

“Sometimes you can get tricked. If you just look at the color of a bale you might think you have something really good. However, that bale could contain a lot of ‘shorts.’ This could negate a good green color.”

 

Regarding yucca fiber, Caddy said the winter months can sometimes reduce the availability of this material. He has not heard of any such reports, however, thus far during the current winter.

 

Caddy also reported that overall business as of late has been “pretty decent.”

 

“There doesn’t seem to be as much manufacturing taking place (in the United States) compared to 15 or 20 years ago, but many (U.S. companies) have learned to adapt,” Caddy said.

 

Tim Monahan, of The Thomas Monahan Co., in Arcola, IL, was unavailable for comment for this month’s broom corn dealer survey.

 


 


asasas

 



Zahoransky's Z.SHARK Provides High Production Output

With Minimum Personnel Expenditure

 

Zahoransky AG, of Todtnau, Germany, has two new machines for the toothbrush production segment — the Z.SHARK 8 and the Z.SHARK twin. The company says these machines provide maximum performance and satisfy the requirements coming from the Asian market.

 

As a high-performance machine for tufting toothbrushes with single or multiple component blocks, the Z.SHARK 8 delivers quality with attractive pricing. The universal version high stacking magazine, which is adjustable in length and width, makes the unit suitable for most single-component toothbrush blocks.

 

Z.SHARK 8


Up to three different colors can be processed by means of a manually-operated triple material container. The continuous operation — without standstill and without reduction of speed between the ejection of a tufted brush and the insertion of a new brush head — helps ensure high efficiency.




Depending on the hole field, up to 1,800 brushes per hour can be produced with an output of 850 bundles per minute. At the same time, the 5.7-inch color touch screen enables simple production of programs for the most diverse toothbrush samples, according to Zahoransky.

 

The Z Shark twin is manually operated and can be completely operated by two persons.

 

Z.SHARK twin

 

The brush blocks are inserted into the cycle belt. Complex toothbrush blocks with TPE on the head and handle can also be processed by means of this procedure. The fully-automatic input for tufting is efficient and reliable. The triple material container provides the required filament in up to three different colors.

 

After tufting, a gripper removes the brushes from the turret and transfers them to the finishing machine. Zahoransky spokespeople say this substantially reduces the effort for internal logistics. At the same time, the maximum assembly with 16 processing stations enables the production of complex topographies with end-rounding quality. Up to 3,600 toothbrushes can be produced in one hour.

Visit www.zahoransky-group.com for more information.

 

 

 



PFERD Introduces Quiet Grinding Wheel

For Aluminum And Non-Ferrous Metals

 

PFERD officials say the SGP WHISPER-ALU is the latest addition to the PFERD line of WHISPER reinforced grinding wheels that significantly reduce noise and vibration when compared to conventional grinding wheels. It features a patented design that allows it to grind aggressively on aluminum and non-ferrous metals and does not clog, according to the company.

SGP WHISPER-ALU

 


With no fillers, no unwanted residue is left on workpieces. Ground surfaces can be welded immediately without further treatment. With high stock removal in a very short grinding time, the PFERD WHISPER-ALU also provides for soft, quiet grinding with lower vibration and greater working comfort to increase productivity and reduce labor costs. 

 

Suitable for use on angle grinders of all output levels, it is ideal for work on weld seams and for grinding surfaces and fillet welds.


WHISPER-ALU is available as a Type 27 depressed center wheel in 4 1/2- and 5-inch diameters with a 1/4-inch thickness.  It is also available with a 7/8 unthreaded arbor hole or a 5/8 - 11 quick-change hub. Call 1-800-342-9015, send email to solutions@pferdusa.com or visit www.pferdusa.com for more information.

 

 

For more information, please visit:

www.pferdusa.com for more information.

 

 



Sponge Maker Armaly Brands Partners With

Asa H. Pritchard For Distribution In The Bahamas

 

Armaly Brands, a manufacturer and marketer of polyester-based sponges including proprietary Estracell® More Sanitary technology, has entered into an agreement with Asa H. Pritchard to distribute the company’s products to the Bahamas.


Under the terms of the agreement, Asa H. Pritchard, a wholesaler located in Nassau, Bahamas, will offer 17 Armaly Brand products sold under the company’s brands, which include Brillo®, Armaly ProPlus® and AutoShow®.

 

This agreement provides an opportunity for Armaly Brands to return to the place where the company originated more than 100 years ago. Armaly Brands got its start in the Bahamas in the early 1900s when W.J. Armaly began harvesting, processing and shipping natural ocean sponges to around the world. When Armaly's son, John W. Armaly, immigrated to the United States, he opened a packing plant in Detroit, MI, and began selling natural sponges, which was the beginning of the Armaly Sponge Company in the United States.

“Armaly Brands was born more than a century ago in a small village in the Bahamas, and from those humble beginnings has grown to be a leader offering a collection of cleaning products used every day by millions of consumers,” John Armaly Jr., president of Armaly Brands, said. “Asa H. Pritchard is a great company and we are looking forward to working together to make Armaly Brands products available once again to consumers in the Bahamas.”

 

“Asa H. Pritchard Ltd., is pleased to be a distributor of Armaly Brands, manufacturer and marketer of Brillo and Brillo Estracell sponges,” Anieka Hanna, marketing manager of Asa H. Pritchard Ltd., said. “It is also indeed a pleasure to be a part of reintroducing Armaly Brands back to The Bahamas where it was started over a century ago. Asa H. Pritchard Ltd., has represented quality and leading brands for years, and Armaly Brands is no exception to this fit.”


Visit www.armalybrands.com for more information.

 

 



Two Nap Heights Are Added To Wooster's Micro Plush Roller Line

 

Wooster Brush is giving painters more microfiber options beyond 5/16-inch nap by expanding its Micro Plush™ line

to include 9/16- and 3/4-inch nap heights.

 


 

The company says Micro Plush rollers are made with soft white microfiber that delivers a very uniform, even finish.

Wooster Micro Plush 9-inch rollers, including the original 5/16-inch nap (R235) for smooth surfaces, have approximate retail prices of $4.99 USD each. The new 9/16-inch nap (R238) and 3/4-inch nap (R249) rollers are recommended for semirough and rough surfaces, respectively. Wooster Micro Plush rollers can be found at traditional paint and decorating centers, hardware stores, and paint sundry distributors and retailers.

 

Visit www.woosterbrush.com for more information.

 



Malish Has Newly Designed Corporate Website

 

The Malish Corporation has a newly designed website (www.malish.com) which highlights rotary brushes and accessories, janitorial and foodservice tools and brushes, and the new Diamabrush By Malish line. The rotary brush section and the janitorial/foodservice section include detailed product specifications, literature for download and price lists. The Diamabrush By Malish landing page directs visitors to the new Diamabrush By Malish website (www.DiamabrushByMalish.com).
In addition to product information, the new website includes improved navigation, an easy-to-use rep search and a comprehensive overview of The Malish Corporation’s history and personnel.


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The Malish Corporation has also introduced its new color-coded foodservice products that are suited for a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) program.

 


 

The color-coded brush system is intended to help prevent cross-contamination.
Malish color-coded foodservice brushes are manufactured in the industry-standard color-coded scheme. There are five colors available including yellow for bakery, green for produce, blue for seafood, red for meat and white for deli.

 

Visit www.malish.com for more information.